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Benefits of mitigation of climate change for coastal areas

Benefits of mitigation of climate change for coastal areas
Benefits of mitigation of climate change for coastal areas
This paper considers the possible benefits of mitigation of climate change for coastal areas with a strong emphasis on sea-level rise as this is one of the most certain consequences of human-induced global warming. There is a long-term 'commitment to sea-level rise' due to the long thermal lags of the ocean system and hence the response of sea-level rise to mitigation is slower than for other climate factors. Therefore, while climate stabilisation reduces coastal impacts during the 21st century, compared to unmitigated emissions, the largest benefits may occur in the 22nd century (and beyond). The results of the analysis suggest that a mixture of adaptation and mitigation policies need to be considered for coastal areas, as this will provide a more robust response to human-induced climate change than either policy in isolation. This requires the joint evaluation of mitigation and adaptation in coastal areas, ideally using a probabilistic risk-based methodology, which would be a departure from existing analyses. Because of the long time constants involved such assessments need to continue beyond 2100 to provide the full implications of the different policy choices.
0959-3780
229-244
Nicholls, Robert J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
Lowe, Jason A.
71d119ba-774f-493e-b5d7-18694f2bdc76
Nicholls, Robert J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
Lowe, Jason A.
71d119ba-774f-493e-b5d7-18694f2bdc76

Nicholls, Robert J. and Lowe, Jason A. (2004) Benefits of mitigation of climate change for coastal areas. Global Environmental Change, 14 (3), 229-244. (doi:10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2004.04.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper considers the possible benefits of mitigation of climate change for coastal areas with a strong emphasis on sea-level rise as this is one of the most certain consequences of human-induced global warming. There is a long-term 'commitment to sea-level rise' due to the long thermal lags of the ocean system and hence the response of sea-level rise to mitigation is slower than for other climate factors. Therefore, while climate stabilisation reduces coastal impacts during the 21st century, compared to unmitigated emissions, the largest benefits may occur in the 22nd century (and beyond). The results of the analysis suggest that a mixture of adaptation and mitigation policies need to be considered for coastal areas, as this will provide a more robust response to human-induced climate change than either policy in isolation. This requires the joint evaluation of mitigation and adaptation in coastal areas, ideally using a probabilistic risk-based methodology, which would be a departure from existing analyses. Because of the long time constants involved such assessments need to continue beyond 2100 to provide the full implications of the different policy choices.

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Published date: 2004

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 39498
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/39498
ISSN: 0959-3780
PURE UUID: dd68dbf1-e8a7-4f1d-b4ae-ac2aa437396f
ORCID for Robert J. Nicholls: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9715-1109

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Date deposited: 28 Jun 2006
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:02

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Author: Jason A. Lowe

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