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Predominantly night-time feeding and weight outcomes in infants

Predominantly night-time feeding and weight outcomes in infants
Predominantly night-time feeding and weight outcomes in infants
Background: The influence of circadian feeding patterns on weight outcomes has been demonstrated in animal and human studies but not in very young children.

Objective: We aimed to examine the association of infant circadian feeding patterns at 12 months with subsequent growth and weight status after one year.

Design: Mothers from a Singapore birth cohort (n=349) reported food given to their infant and the feeding time at 12 months of age. Predominantly day-time (pDT, 0700-1859h, n=282) and predominantly night-time (pNT, 1900-0659h, n=67) feeding infants were defined by whether daytime energy intake was >50% or <50% of total energy intake assessed by 24-hour recall. Body Mass Index Z-scores (BAZ) were computed using World Health Organization Child Growth Standards 2006 to determine changes in BAZ from 12 to 24 months and weight status at 24 months. Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were performed.

Results: Compared to pDT feeding, pNT feeding was associated with higher BAZ gain from 12-24 months (adjusted ?=0.38, 95% CI=0.11 to 0.65, p=0.006) and an increased risk of becoming overweight at 24 months (adjusted OR=2.78, 95% CI=1.11 to 6.97, p=0.029), with adjustments for maternal age, education, ethnicity, monthly household income, parity, infant BAZ at 12 months, feeding mode in the first six months of life and total daily energy intake.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that the role of daily distribution of energy consumption in weight regulation begins in infancy. Feeding infants predominantly during night-time hours was associated with adiposity gain and risk of overweight in early childhood. Including advice on appropriate feeding time may be considered when implementing strategies to combat childhood obesity.
0002-9165
1-31
Cheng, T.S.
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Loy, S.L.
967951b0-5a39-4824-abee-abf33a2cd309
Toh, J.Y.
df9eaa30-9ea7-47e0-852f-da55e194ba39
Cheung, Y.B.
13219412-856a-4418-839a-d890f3522ba5
Chan, J.K.Y.
2d78152d-94ae-4bb7-a040-eaa6fbd4e9b3
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Gluckman, P.D.
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Saw, S.M.
0684517e-f27e-49f0-98c3-7630e8fd1bbd
Chong, Y-S
436a467c-1372-4c9c-857c-7a913ba5fcb8
Lee, Y.S.
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Lek, N.
a15e37b6-a84f-4cfa-b755-79ccf4b7f54e
Foong-Foo Cong, M.
2da31139-7072-427b-82bc-6af164e73523
Yap, F.
2c155211-be02-4dd5-9528-16a714e77452
Cheng, T.S.
8c2e7902-92c9-4508-8ff1-8273b7b0951e
Loy, S.L.
967951b0-5a39-4824-abee-abf33a2cd309
Toh, J.Y.
df9eaa30-9ea7-47e0-852f-da55e194ba39
Cheung, Y.B.
13219412-856a-4418-839a-d890f3522ba5
Chan, J.K.Y.
2d78152d-94ae-4bb7-a040-eaa6fbd4e9b3
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Gluckman, P.D.
492295c0-ef71-4871-ad5a-771c98e1059a
Saw, S.M.
0684517e-f27e-49f0-98c3-7630e8fd1bbd
Chong, Y-S
436a467c-1372-4c9c-857c-7a913ba5fcb8
Lee, Y.S.
829a41bb-945c-49cd-ad12-0f3d9c2782c6
Lek, N.
a15e37b6-a84f-4cfa-b755-79ccf4b7f54e
Foong-Foo Cong, M.
2da31139-7072-427b-82bc-6af164e73523
Yap, F.
2c155211-be02-4dd5-9528-16a714e77452

Cheng, T.S., Loy, S.L., Toh, J.Y., Cheung, Y.B., Chan, J.K.Y., Godfrey, K.M., Gluckman, P.D., Saw, S.M., Chong, Y-S, Lee, Y.S., Lek, N., Foong-Foo Cong, M. and Yap, F. (2016) Predominantly night-time feeding and weight outcomes in infants. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1-31. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The influence of circadian feeding patterns on weight outcomes has been demonstrated in animal and human studies but not in very young children.

Objective: We aimed to examine the association of infant circadian feeding patterns at 12 months with subsequent growth and weight status after one year.

Design: Mothers from a Singapore birth cohort (n=349) reported food given to their infant and the feeding time at 12 months of age. Predominantly day-time (pDT, 0700-1859h, n=282) and predominantly night-time (pNT, 1900-0659h, n=67) feeding infants were defined by whether daytime energy intake was >50% or <50% of total energy intake assessed by 24-hour recall. Body Mass Index Z-scores (BAZ) were computed using World Health Organization Child Growth Standards 2006 to determine changes in BAZ from 12 to 24 months and weight status at 24 months. Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were performed.

Results: Compared to pDT feeding, pNT feeding was associated with higher BAZ gain from 12-24 months (adjusted ?=0.38, 95% CI=0.11 to 0.65, p=0.006) and an increased risk of becoming overweight at 24 months (adjusted OR=2.78, 95% CI=1.11 to 6.97, p=0.029), with adjustments for maternal age, education, ethnicity, monthly household income, parity, infant BAZ at 12 months, feeding mode in the first six months of life and total daily energy intake.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that the role of daily distribution of energy consumption in weight regulation begins in infancy. Feeding infants predominantly during night-time hours was associated with adiposity gain and risk of overweight in early childhood. Including advice on appropriate feeding time may be considered when implementing strategies to combat childhood obesity.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 May 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 395228
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/395228
ISSN: 0002-9165
PURE UUID: 71525a45-0149-4f25-b725-60b646ca3337
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 26 May 2016 08:52
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:35

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Contributors

Author: T.S. Cheng
Author: S.L. Loy
Author: J.Y. Toh
Author: Y.B. Cheung
Author: J.K.Y. Chan
Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: P.D. Gluckman
Author: S.M. Saw
Author: Y-S Chong
Author: Y.S. Lee
Author: N. Lek
Author: M. Foong-Foo Cong
Author: F. Yap

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