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The breakdown of knowledge: people and pottery at the Bronze Age tell at Százhalombatta-Földvár, Hungary:

The breakdown of knowledge: people and pottery at the Bronze Age tell at Százhalombatta-Földvár, Hungary:
The breakdown of knowledge: people and pottery at the Bronze Age tell at Százhalombatta-Földvár, Hungary:
The site of Százhalombatta-Földvár, situated on the west bank of the Danube 30 km south of Budapest, is one of the most important fortified Bronze Age temperate tell settlements in the region. Occupied from the Early Bronze Age to the beginning of the Late Bronze Age, this site offers an opportunity to trace the construction and break- down of networks in which craft knowledge was accumulated through investigation of changes in ceramic production. While a sophisticated ceramic tradition flourished in earlier periods, it appears to have disintegrated with social breakdown in the later phases. The identification of social networks through changes in both the manufacture of ceramics and the transmission of knowledge of how to make them enables us to trace this process of social collapse.
69-83
Oxbow Books
Sofaer, J.
038f9eb2-5863-46ef-8eaf-fb2513b75ee2
Foxhall, L.
Sofaer, J.
038f9eb2-5863-46ef-8eaf-fb2513b75ee2
Foxhall, L.

Sofaer, J. (2021) The breakdown of knowledge: people and pottery at the Bronze Age tell at Százhalombatta-Földvár, Hungary:. In, Foxhall, L. (ed.) Interrogating Networks. Investigating Networks of Knowledge in Antiquity. London, GB. Oxbow Books, pp. 69-83.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The site of Százhalombatta-Földvár, situated on the west bank of the Danube 30 km south of Budapest, is one of the most important fortified Bronze Age temperate tell settlements in the region. Occupied from the Early Bronze Age to the beginning of the Late Bronze Age, this site offers an opportunity to trace the construction and break- down of networks in which craft knowledge was accumulated through investigation of changes in ceramic production. While a sophisticated ceramic tradition flourished in earlier periods, it appears to have disintegrated with social breakdown in the later phases. The identification of social networks through changes in both the manufacture of ceramics and the transmission of knowledge of how to make them enables us to trace this process of social collapse.

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Accepted/In Press date: 2016
Published date: 10 May 2021
Organisations: Archaeology

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Local EPrints ID: 395282
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/395282
PURE UUID: c5f71a5b-10ad-4e08-bfa4-17b8629637af

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Date deposited: 06 Jun 2016 10:48
Last modified: 29 Jul 2021 16:33

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