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Developmental aspects of a life course approach to healthy ageing

Developmental aspects of a life course approach to healthy ageing
Developmental aspects of a life course approach to healthy ageing
examine the mechanistic basis and wider implications of adopting a developmental perspective on human ageing. Previous models of ageing have concentrated on its genetic basis, or the detrimental effects of accumulated damage, but also have raised issues about whether ageing can be viewed as adaptive itself, or is a consequence of other adaptive processes, for example if maintenance and repair processes in the period up to reproduction are traded off against later decline in function. A life course model places ageing in the context of the attainment of peak capacity for a body system, starting in early development when plasticity permits changes in structure and function induced by a range of environmental stimuli, followed by a period of decline, the rate of which depends on the peak attained as well as the later life conditions. Such path dependency in the rate of ageing may offer new insights into its modification. Focusing on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular function, we discuss this model and the possible underlying mechanisms, including endothelial function, oxidative stress, stem cells and nutritional factors such as vitamin D status. Epigenetic changes induced during developmental plasticity, and immune function may provide a common mechanistic process underlying a life course model of ageing. The life course trajectory differs in high and low resource settings. New insights into the developmental components of the life course model of ageing may lead to the design of biomarkers of later chronic disease risk and to new interventions to promote healthy ageing, with important implications for public health.
0022-3751
2147-2160
Hanson, M.A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Eendebak, R.J.A.H.
20ad57f0-4e3c-4de8-adb3-93cb9e59c17c
Clough, G.F.
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
Beard, J.R.
31defb4b-a1a0-496f-90bc-926bab8aabc3
Hanson, M.A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Eendebak, R.J.A.H.
20ad57f0-4e3c-4de8-adb3-93cb9e59c17c
Clough, G.F.
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
Beard, J.R.
31defb4b-a1a0-496f-90bc-926bab8aabc3

Hanson, M.A., Cooper, C., Aihie Sayer, A., Eendebak, R.J.A.H., Clough, G.F. and Beard, J.R. (2016) Developmental aspects of a life course approach to healthy ageing. The Journal of Physiology, 594 (8), 2147-2160. (doi:10.1113/JP270579). (PMID:26518329)

Record type: Article

Abstract

examine the mechanistic basis and wider implications of adopting a developmental perspective on human ageing. Previous models of ageing have concentrated on its genetic basis, or the detrimental effects of accumulated damage, but also have raised issues about whether ageing can be viewed as adaptive itself, or is a consequence of other adaptive processes, for example if maintenance and repair processes in the period up to reproduction are traded off against later decline in function. A life course model places ageing in the context of the attainment of peak capacity for a body system, starting in early development when plasticity permits changes in structure and function induced by a range of environmental stimuli, followed by a period of decline, the rate of which depends on the peak attained as well as the later life conditions. Such path dependency in the rate of ageing may offer new insights into its modification. Focusing on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular function, we discuss this model and the possible underlying mechanisms, including endothelial function, oxidative stress, stem cells and nutritional factors such as vitamin D status. Epigenetic changes induced during developmental plasticity, and immune function may provide a common mechanistic process underlying a life course model of ageing. The life course trajectory differs in high and low resource settings. New insights into the developmental components of the life course model of ageing may lead to the design of biomarkers of later chronic disease risk and to new interventions to promote healthy ageing, with important implications for public health.

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Accepted/In Press date: 30 September 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 February 2016
Published date: 15 April 2016
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 395588
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/395588
ISSN: 0022-3751
PURE UUID: 567bc836-edea-4af7-aeb1-0be8ae1ea38a
ORCID for M.A. Hanson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6907-613X
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for G.F. Clough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6226-8964

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Date deposited: 01 Jun 2016 14:41
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:57

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