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Molten metals: a challenge for measurement

Molten metals: a challenge for measurement
Molten metals: a challenge for measurement
The transport properties of fluids are, arguably, more sensitive probes of the forces between molecular species than are the equilibrium thermodynamic properties. The same properties are of engineering significance because they determine the size of process plant while equilibrium properties often determine feasibility. However, the measurement of the transport properties with an accuracy, which has enabled advantage of this circumstance to be taken, has proved rather more difficult and the industrial need for properties alone has seldom justified the effort. Lessons that have been learned about the measurement of the transport properties of simple fluids such as the monatomic gases and organic liquids have now provided the experience upon which to base measurements on less traditional materials under harsher conditions.
The present paper reviews some of these historical lessons and shows how they have been applied to just one example from among current activities. The example concerns the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals in a manner which can be validated at moderate temperatures and subsequently applied to more aggressive conditions.
molten metals, thermal conductivity, non-equilibrium properties, transport properties
0021-9614
1623-1642
Wakeham, W.A.
88549729-a39a-497f-b112-feaa6be2c449
Peralta Martinez, V.
4267e825-37e5-44b2-9fc4-dabcd3cee0d4
Wakeham, W.A.
88549729-a39a-497f-b112-feaa6be2c449
Peralta Martinez, V.
4267e825-37e5-44b2-9fc4-dabcd3cee0d4

Wakeham, W.A. and Peralta Martinez, V. (2001) Molten metals: a challenge for measurement. Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics, 33 (12), 1623-1642. (doi:10.1006/jcht.2000.0821).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The transport properties of fluids are, arguably, more sensitive probes of the forces between molecular species than are the equilibrium thermodynamic properties. The same properties are of engineering significance because they determine the size of process plant while equilibrium properties often determine feasibility. However, the measurement of the transport properties with an accuracy, which has enabled advantage of this circumstance to be taken, has proved rather more difficult and the industrial need for properties alone has seldom justified the effort. Lessons that have been learned about the measurement of the transport properties of simple fluids such as the monatomic gases and organic liquids have now provided the experience upon which to base measurements on less traditional materials under harsher conditions.
The present paper reviews some of these historical lessons and shows how they have been applied to just one example from among current activities. The example concerns the measurement of the thermal conductivity of molten metals in a manner which can be validated at moderate temperatures and subsequently applied to more aggressive conditions.

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More information

Published date: 2001
Keywords: molten metals, thermal conductivity, non-equilibrium properties, transport properties

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 39585
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/39585
ISSN: 0021-9614
PURE UUID: f02cea40-477e-4bf5-88b4-6089500f9786

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jun 2006
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 19:00

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