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Stereoselective synthesis of spirocyclic compounds: Organocatalyzed methodologies

Stereoselective synthesis of spirocyclic compounds: Organocatalyzed methodologies
Stereoselective synthesis of spirocyclic compounds: Organocatalyzed methodologies
The synthesis of complex molecules is one of the most challenging goals for synthetic chemists. The high complexity of natural products has fascinated organic chemists over the decades. One of the most important challenges for synthetic organic chemists is the regiocontrolled and stereocontrolled synthesis of quaternary carbon centers, in particular, the enantioselective synthesis of spirocyclic compounds. The spirocycles demonstrate high complexity because of the presence of central chirality or even axial chirality. Spiroatoms can be chiral even though they do not possess four different substituents normally observed in stereocenters. The high complexity of spiro compounds has attracted synthetic chemists since the nineteenth century. This chapter draws the readers' attention to the enantioselective organocascade C–C bond-forming reactions that have a huge role in the rapid synthesis of highly complex spirocyclic compounds. The goal is to mimic the natural conditions by highly enantioselective sequential syntheses.
271-306
John Wiley & Sons
Rios Torres, Ramon
609bedf2-e886-4d62-a676-a32b6f8c1441
Rodriguez, Jean
Bonne, Damien
Rios Torres, Ramon
609bedf2-e886-4d62-a676-a32b6f8c1441
Rodriguez, Jean
Bonne, Damien

Rios Torres, Ramon (2015) Stereoselective synthesis of spirocyclic compounds: Organocatalyzed methodologies. In, Rodriguez, Jean and Bonne, Damien (eds.) Stereoselective Multiple Bond-Forming Transformations in Organic Synthesis. Hoboken, US. John Wiley & Sons, pp. 271-306. (doi:10.1002/9781119006220.ch10).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The synthesis of complex molecules is one of the most challenging goals for synthetic chemists. The high complexity of natural products has fascinated organic chemists over the decades. One of the most important challenges for synthetic organic chemists is the regiocontrolled and stereocontrolled synthesis of quaternary carbon centers, in particular, the enantioselective synthesis of spirocyclic compounds. The spirocycles demonstrate high complexity because of the presence of central chirality or even axial chirality. Spiroatoms can be chiral even though they do not possess four different substituents normally observed in stereocenters. The high complexity of spiro compounds has attracted synthetic chemists since the nineteenth century. This chapter draws the readers' attention to the enantioselective organocascade C–C bond-forming reactions that have a huge role in the rapid synthesis of highly complex spirocyclic compounds. The goal is to mimic the natural conditions by highly enantioselective sequential syntheses.

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More information

Published date: 24 April 2015
Organisations: Organic Chemistry: Synthesis, Catalysis and Flow

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 395984
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/395984
PURE UUID: 348a0ec2-8650-4e99-9a39-29c8d32eb19b
ORCID for Ramon Rios Torres: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3843-8521

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jun 2016 16:03
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:42

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Contributors

Editor: Jean Rodriguez
Editor: Damien Bonne

University divisions

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