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The effect of prepubertal calcium carbonate supplementation on skeletal development in Gambian boys-a 12-year follow-up study

The effect of prepubertal calcium carbonate supplementation on skeletal development in Gambian boys-a 12-year follow-up study
The effect of prepubertal calcium carbonate supplementation on skeletal development in Gambian boys-a 12-year follow-up study
CONTEXT: Calcium intake during growth is essential for future bone health but varies widely between individuals and populations. The impact on bone of increasing calcium intake is unknown in a population where low calcium intake, stunting, and delayed puberty are common.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of prepubertal calcium supplementation on mean age at peak velocity for bone growth and mineral accrual.

DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective follow-up of boys in rural Gambia, West Africa, who had participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of calcium supplementation.

PARTICIPANTS: Eighty boys, initially aged 8.0-11.9 years, were followed up for 12 years.

INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received 1 year of calcium carbonate supplementation (1000 mg daily, 5 d/wk).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements were carried out for whole body (WB), lumbar spine, and total hip bone mineral content, bone area (BA), and WB lean mass. Super imposition by translation and rotation models was made to assess bone growth.

RESULTS: Age at peak velocity was consistently earlier in the calcium group compared to the placebo group, for WB bone mineral content (mean, -6.2 [SE, 3.1]; P = .05), WB BA (mean, -7.0 [SE, 3.2] mo; P = .03), lumbar spine and total hip BA. By young adulthood, supplementation did not change the amount of bone accrued (mineral or size) or the rate of bone growth.

CONCLUSIONS: Twelve months of prepubertal calcium carbonate supplementation in boys with a low calcium diet advanced the adolescent growth spurt but had no lasting effect on bone mineral or bone size. There is a need for caution when applying international recommendations to different populations
0021-972X
3169-3176
Ward, K.A.
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cole, T.J.
d514e2dd-426b-45af-8581-952d9fc3c8a6
Laskey, M.A.
8a77e28a-c808-4014-8e79-6c8e05c8cdeb
Ceesay, M.
55ceaf86-411d-4163-a16d-208ebaff62ac
Mendy, M.B.
ca1b1757-0eef-44ac-825f-107ede531764
Sawo, Y.
c215f5ac-1420-4bac-8b51-a170bf1dcd6f
Prentice, A.
b103f864-7606-4860-8bf2-125b4be3c0f3
Ward, K.A.
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Cole, T.J.
d514e2dd-426b-45af-8581-952d9fc3c8a6
Laskey, M.A.
8a77e28a-c808-4014-8e79-6c8e05c8cdeb
Ceesay, M.
55ceaf86-411d-4163-a16d-208ebaff62ac
Mendy, M.B.
ca1b1757-0eef-44ac-825f-107ede531764
Sawo, Y.
c215f5ac-1420-4bac-8b51-a170bf1dcd6f
Prentice, A.
b103f864-7606-4860-8bf2-125b4be3c0f3

Ward, K.A., Cole, T.J., Laskey, M.A., Ceesay, M., Mendy, M.B., Sawo, Y. and Prentice, A. (2014) The effect of prepubertal calcium carbonate supplementation on skeletal development in Gambian boys-a 12-year follow-up study. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 99 (9), 3169-3176. (doi:10.1210/jc.2014-1150). (PMID:24762110)

Record type: Article

Abstract

CONTEXT: Calcium intake during growth is essential for future bone health but varies widely between individuals and populations. The impact on bone of increasing calcium intake is unknown in a population where low calcium intake, stunting, and delayed puberty are common.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of prepubertal calcium supplementation on mean age at peak velocity for bone growth and mineral accrual.

DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective follow-up of boys in rural Gambia, West Africa, who had participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of calcium supplementation.

PARTICIPANTS: Eighty boys, initially aged 8.0-11.9 years, were followed up for 12 years.

INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received 1 year of calcium carbonate supplementation (1000 mg daily, 5 d/wk).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements were carried out for whole body (WB), lumbar spine, and total hip bone mineral content, bone area (BA), and WB lean mass. Super imposition by translation and rotation models was made to assess bone growth.

RESULTS: Age at peak velocity was consistently earlier in the calcium group compared to the placebo group, for WB bone mineral content (mean, -6.2 [SE, 3.1]; P = .05), WB BA (mean, -7.0 [SE, 3.2] mo; P = .03), lumbar spine and total hip BA. By young adulthood, supplementation did not change the amount of bone accrued (mineral or size) or the rate of bone growth.

CONCLUSIONS: Twelve months of prepubertal calcium carbonate supplementation in boys with a low calcium diet advanced the adolescent growth spurt but had no lasting effect on bone mineral or bone size. There is a need for caution when applying international recommendations to different populations

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Accepted/In Press date: 16 April 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 April 2014
Published date: 1 September 2014
Organisations: MRC Life-Course Epidemiology Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396005
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396005
ISSN: 0021-972X
PURE UUID: 24e59d64-5545-4b7f-8c4f-0be78576f942
ORCID for K.A. Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750

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Date deposited: 02 Jun 2016 11:15
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:32

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Author: K.A. Ward ORCID iD
Author: T.J. Cole
Author: M.A. Laskey
Author: M. Ceesay
Author: M.B. Mendy
Author: Y. Sawo
Author: A. Prentice

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