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Painting maps with bats: species distribution modelling in bat research and conservation

Painting maps with bats: species distribution modelling in bat research and conservation
Painting maps with bats: species distribution modelling in bat research and conservation
Species distribution models (SDMs) offer an effective tool for identifying species conservation requirements and forecasting how global environmental changes will affect species diversity and distribution. This approach is particularly relevant for bats because their nocturnal behaviour hinders detectability and identification in flight. Despite their important contribution to global biodiversity and wide geographical ranges, bats have been under-represented in early SDM studies, and only in the last few years has this approach become more widely used in bat research. We carried out a meta-analysis of the published literature to review the history of the use of SDMs in bat research and their application in conservation, climate change assessments and genetic studies. We focus on the geographical coverage, theme and modelling algorithm of published studies, and compare studies that are uniquely dedicated to bats to multi-taxa studies that include bats. We provide recommendations for good modelling practices through considering spatial scale and spatial biases, selecting ecologically relevant variables, following rigorous modelling protocols, and recognising the limitations of extrapolation across temporal scales. We suggest future developments that will further favour the use of SDMs to study bat ecology and biogeography, as well as inform conservation management. We conclude that despite an increase in bat SDM studies, their scope and application can be further enhanced through incorporating dispersal, landscape connectivity and biotic interactions between bats, their prey and their pathogens.
0394-1914
1-8
Razgour, Orly
107f4912-304a-44d5-99f8-cdf2a9ce6f14
Rebelo, Hugo
2fcf412a-49f4-41fe-9099-ad9b03a890b6
Di Febbraro, Mirko
00dbd190-2d0c-4311-979c-f1c706d51f8c
Russo, Danilo
da0cb292-a6c8-4d7d-ac52-702153623fe2
Razgour, Orly
107f4912-304a-44d5-99f8-cdf2a9ce6f14
Rebelo, Hugo
2fcf412a-49f4-41fe-9099-ad9b03a890b6
Di Febbraro, Mirko
00dbd190-2d0c-4311-979c-f1c706d51f8c
Russo, Danilo
da0cb292-a6c8-4d7d-ac52-702153623fe2

Razgour, Orly, Rebelo, Hugo, Di Febbraro, Mirko and Russo, Danilo (2016) Painting maps with bats: species distribution modelling in bat research and conservation. Hystrix, 27 (1), 1-8. (doi:10.4404/hystrix-27.1-11753).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Species distribution models (SDMs) offer an effective tool for identifying species conservation requirements and forecasting how global environmental changes will affect species diversity and distribution. This approach is particularly relevant for bats because their nocturnal behaviour hinders detectability and identification in flight. Despite their important contribution to global biodiversity and wide geographical ranges, bats have been under-represented in early SDM studies, and only in the last few years has this approach become more widely used in bat research. We carried out a meta-analysis of the published literature to review the history of the use of SDMs in bat research and their application in conservation, climate change assessments and genetic studies. We focus on the geographical coverage, theme and modelling algorithm of published studies, and compare studies that are uniquely dedicated to bats to multi-taxa studies that include bats. We provide recommendations for good modelling practices through considering spatial scale and spatial biases, selecting ecologically relevant variables, following rigorous modelling protocols, and recognising the limitations of extrapolation across temporal scales. We suggest future developments that will further favour the use of SDMs to study bat ecology and biogeography, as well as inform conservation management. We conclude that despite an increase in bat SDM studies, their scope and application can be further enhanced through incorporating dispersal, landscape connectivity and biotic interactions between bats, their prey and their pathogens.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 June 2016
Published date: 22 July 2016
Organisations: Environmental

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396006
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396006
ISSN: 0394-1914
PURE UUID: 173465ff-12b3-45e3-bbea-f2fcb62e2f9d
ORCID for Orly Razgour: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3186-0313

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 May 2016 11:15
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:05

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Contributors

Author: Orly Razgour ORCID iD
Author: Hugo Rebelo
Author: Mirko Di Febbraro
Author: Danilo Russo

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