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Maternal macronutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with neonatal abdominal adiposity: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards health Outcomes (GUSTO) study

Maternal macronutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with neonatal abdominal adiposity: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards health Outcomes (GUSTO) study
Maternal macronutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with neonatal abdominal adiposity: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards health Outcomes (GUSTO) study
Background: Infant body composition has been associated with later metabolic risk, but few studies have examined the association between maternal macronutrient intake and neonatal body composition. Furthermore, most of those studies have used proxy measures of body composition that may not reflect body fat distribution, particularly abdominal internal adiposity.

Objective: We investigated the relation between maternal macronutrient intake and neonatal abdominal adiposity measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a multi-ethnic Asian mother-offspring cohort.

Methods: Macronutrient intakes of mothers were ascertained using a 24-h dietary recall at 26-28 weeks gestation. Neonatal abdominal adiposity was assessed using MRI in the second week of life. Mother-offspring dyads with complete macronutrient intake and adiposity information (n= 320) were included in the analysis. Associations were assessed by both substitution and addition models using multivariable linear regressions.

Results: Mothers [mean age: 30 y; 44% Chinese, 38% Malay, 18% Indians] consumed 15.5 ± 4.3% (mean ± SD) of their energy intakes from protein, 32.4 ± 7.7% from fat, and 52.1 ± 9.0% from carbohydrate. A higher protein, lower carbohydrate/fat diet during pregnancy was associated with lower abdominal internal adipose tissue (IAT) in the neonates [? (95% CI): -0.18 (-0.35, -0.001) mL per 1% protein to carbohydrate substitution and -0.25 (-0.46, -0.04) mL per 1% protein to fat substitution]. These associations were stronger in boys than in girls (P-interactions <0.05). Higher maternal intake of animal protein [-0.26 (-0.47, -0.05) mL for fat substitution], but not plant protein, was associated with lower offspring IAT. In contrast, maternal macronutrient intake was not consistently associated with infant anthropometric measurements, including abdominal circumference and subscapular skinfold thickness.

Conclusions: Higher maternal protein intake (at the expense of carbohydrate or fat intake) at 26-28 wk of gestation was associated with lower abdominal internal adiposity in neonates. Optimizing maternal dietary balance might be a new approach to potentially improve offspring body composition.
0022-3166
1571-1579
Chen, L.W.
59362eef-bb95-4927-ab2d-f8a4495d90a4
Tint, M.T.
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Fortier, M.V.
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Aris, I.M.
ee15a46e-ead3-4b4a-a208-d39038a85480
Bernard, J.Y.
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Colega, M.
222d8007-2da2-4240-b08a-636dd99879e1
Gluckman, P.
dadc86d4-4eaa-4589-b560-413a9e564558
Saw, S-M.
d308600d-81e3-43fd-aae6-24405627e55e
Chong, Y-P
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Yap, F.
2c155211-be02-4dd5-9528-16a714e77452
Godfrey, K.
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Kramer, M.S.
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van Dam, R.M.
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Foong-Fong Chong, M.
ab0f3995-5b25-4018-8a5c-629b79971671
Lee, Y.S.
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Chen, L.W.
59362eef-bb95-4927-ab2d-f8a4495d90a4
Tint, M.T.
02d6a006-3b94-4328-b3c3-147a618d66c3
Fortier, M.V.
3567d96b-8db6-41be-88fd-45af16ebb7da
Aris, I.M.
ee15a46e-ead3-4b4a-a208-d39038a85480
Bernard, J.Y.
1a5b77ae-6090-4f80-8db2-4918e444b429
Colega, M.
222d8007-2da2-4240-b08a-636dd99879e1
Gluckman, P.
dadc86d4-4eaa-4589-b560-413a9e564558
Saw, S-M.
d308600d-81e3-43fd-aae6-24405627e55e
Chong, Y-P
352c0744-891c-4562-af15-1bf1812f47d3
Yap, F.
2c155211-be02-4dd5-9528-16a714e77452
Godfrey, K.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Kramer, M.S.
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van Dam, R.M.
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Foong-Fong Chong, M.
ab0f3995-5b25-4018-8a5c-629b79971671
Lee, Y.S.
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Chen, L.W., Tint, M.T., Fortier, M.V., Aris, I.M., Bernard, J.Y., Colega, M., Gluckman, P., Saw, S-M., Chong, Y-P, Yap, F., Godfrey, K., Kramer, M.S., van Dam, R.M., Foong-Fong Chong, M. and Lee, Y.S. (2016) Maternal macronutrient intake during pregnancy is associated with neonatal abdominal adiposity: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards health Outcomes (GUSTO) study. Journal of Nutrition, 146 (8), 1571-1579. (doi:10.3945/?jn.116.230730). (PMID:27385763)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Infant body composition has been associated with later metabolic risk, but few studies have examined the association between maternal macronutrient intake and neonatal body composition. Furthermore, most of those studies have used proxy measures of body composition that may not reflect body fat distribution, particularly abdominal internal adiposity.

Objective: We investigated the relation between maternal macronutrient intake and neonatal abdominal adiposity measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a multi-ethnic Asian mother-offspring cohort.

Methods: Macronutrient intakes of mothers were ascertained using a 24-h dietary recall at 26-28 weeks gestation. Neonatal abdominal adiposity was assessed using MRI in the second week of life. Mother-offspring dyads with complete macronutrient intake and adiposity information (n= 320) were included in the analysis. Associations were assessed by both substitution and addition models using multivariable linear regressions.

Results: Mothers [mean age: 30 y; 44% Chinese, 38% Malay, 18% Indians] consumed 15.5 ± 4.3% (mean ± SD) of their energy intakes from protein, 32.4 ± 7.7% from fat, and 52.1 ± 9.0% from carbohydrate. A higher protein, lower carbohydrate/fat diet during pregnancy was associated with lower abdominal internal adipose tissue (IAT) in the neonates [? (95% CI): -0.18 (-0.35, -0.001) mL per 1% protein to carbohydrate substitution and -0.25 (-0.46, -0.04) mL per 1% protein to fat substitution]. These associations were stronger in boys than in girls (P-interactions <0.05). Higher maternal intake of animal protein [-0.26 (-0.47, -0.05) mL for fat substitution], but not plant protein, was associated with lower offspring IAT. In contrast, maternal macronutrient intake was not consistently associated with infant anthropometric measurements, including abdominal circumference and subscapular skinfold thickness.

Conclusions: Higher maternal protein intake (at the expense of carbohydrate or fat intake) at 26-28 wk of gestation was associated with lower abdominal internal adiposity in neonates. Optimizing maternal dietary balance might be a new approach to potentially improve offspring body composition.

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Accepted/In Press date: 31 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 July 2016
Published date: 1 August 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396236
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396236
ISSN: 0022-3166
PURE UUID: 2677a785-0a3c-4865-89a2-14004be4b64b
ORCID for K. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 01 Jun 2016 10:08
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:55

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Contributors

Author: L.W. Chen
Author: M.T. Tint
Author: M.V. Fortier
Author: I.M. Aris
Author: J.Y. Bernard
Author: M. Colega
Author: P. Gluckman
Author: S-M. Saw
Author: Y-P Chong
Author: F. Yap
Author: K. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: M.S. Kramer
Author: R.M. van Dam
Author: M. Foong-Fong Chong
Author: Y.S. Lee

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