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Is the Tea Party libertarian, authoritarian, or something else?

Is the Tea Party libertarian, authoritarian, or something else?
Is the Tea Party libertarian, authoritarian, or something else?
Objective: Research on the Tea Party finds that both libertarian and authoritarian attitudes drive support for this movement, but political scientists lack a satisfactory explanation of this contradiction.
Methods: Factor analysis of nine attitudes from the 2012 American National Election Study is used to explore whether statism and moral traditionalism are intercorrelated on a dimension distinct from attitudes toward government; regression analysis is used to test if these distinct dimensions help to explain support for the Tea Party.
Results: Controlling for several competing explanations, the multiplicative interaction of anti‐government and morally statist ideological factors is shown to be a predictor of Tea Party support, especially among conservatives.
Conclusion: Our results suggest the Tea Party movement is in part driven by what Nietzsche called “misarchism,” an ideological mixture of moralism, statism, and libertarianism he first observed in Herbert Spencer.
0038-4941
1021-1037
Havercroft, Jonathan
929f9452-daf9-4859-9f59-88348846949a
Murphy, Justin
cdf28232-2d67-4188-98cf-d81896682bf0
Havercroft, Jonathan
929f9452-daf9-4859-9f59-88348846949a
Murphy, Justin
cdf28232-2d67-4188-98cf-d81896682bf0

Havercroft, Jonathan and Murphy, Justin (2018) Is the Tea Party libertarian, authoritarian, or something else? Social Science Quarterly, 99 (3), 1021-1037. (doi:10.1111/ssqu.12495).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Research on the Tea Party finds that both libertarian and authoritarian attitudes drive support for this movement, but political scientists lack a satisfactory explanation of this contradiction.
Methods: Factor analysis of nine attitudes from the 2012 American National Election Study is used to explore whether statism and moral traditionalism are intercorrelated on a dimension distinct from attitudes toward government; regression analysis is used to test if these distinct dimensions help to explain support for the Tea Party.
Results: Controlling for several competing explanations, the multiplicative interaction of anti‐government and morally statist ideological factors is shown to be a predictor of Tea Party support, especially among conservatives.
Conclusion: Our results suggest the Tea Party movement is in part driven by what Nietzsche called “misarchism,” an ideological mixture of moralism, statism, and libertarianism he first observed in Herbert Spencer.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 March 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 March 2018
Published date: September 2018
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396316
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396316
ISSN: 0038-4941
PURE UUID: 244bfafb-9651-4377-bc5f-da98448563e8
ORCID for Jonathan Havercroft: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0995-8912

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Date deposited: 15 Jun 2016 10:47
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:23

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Author: Justin Murphy

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