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Musicians within the social hierarchies of Eighteenth–Century England: the case of Thomas Linley junior

Musicians within the social hierarchies of Eighteenth–Century England: the case of Thomas Linley junior
Musicians within the social hierarchies of Eighteenth–Century England: the case of Thomas Linley junior
Thomas Linley junior, a musician in the late eighteenth century, created networks to facilitate his upward social movement despite the low status accorded to members of his profession in Britain at the time. Supported by his father, the family’s trajectory was to move into the upper echelons of society, leaving behind the low social status of musicians. The financially unstable, and socially inferior, view of the eighteenth–century musician has persisted throughout music history. By using Thomas Linley Junior as a case study I will show that this view, and expectation of musicians to be financially unstable, is not entirely accurate. Simon McVeigh has made forays into this area of music history already, with his research into the Italian violinist Giardini and his connections. This thesis takes his work a step further, using sociological theories by Pierre Bourdieu and Howard Becker to investigate these networks, their benefits and effects on their constituent connections.
Gribble, Rebecca
b121e872-4aa3-43fc-b002-955b6ca99b93
Gribble, Rebecca
b121e872-4aa3-43fc-b002-955b6ca99b93
Irvine, Thomas
aab08974-17f8-4614-86be-e94e7b9cfe76

(2015) Musicians within the social hierarchies of Eighteenth–Century England: the case of Thomas Linley junior. University of Southampton, Faculty of Humanities, Doctoral Thesis, 428pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Thomas Linley junior, a musician in the late eighteenth century, created networks to facilitate his upward social movement despite the low status accorded to members of his profession in Britain at the time. Supported by his father, the family’s trajectory was to move into the upper echelons of society, leaving behind the low social status of musicians. The financially unstable, and socially inferior, view of the eighteenth–century musician has persisted throughout music history. By using Thomas Linley Junior as a case study I will show that this view, and expectation of musicians to be financially unstable, is not entirely accurate. Simon McVeigh has made forays into this area of music history already, with his research into the Italian violinist Giardini and his connections. This thesis takes his work a step further, using sociological theories by Pierre Bourdieu and Howard Becker to investigate these networks, their benefits and effects on their constituent connections.

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More information

Published date: July 2015
Organisations: University of Southampton, Music

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396330
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396330
PURE UUID: b647a57a-31b3-4ec7-9a2d-4981b9ea188d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Jul 2016 11:33
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 18:50

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Contributors

Author: Rebecca Gribble
Thesis advisor: Thomas Irvine

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