The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Implementing resources to support the diagnosis and management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) in primary care: a qualitative study

Implementing resources to support the diagnosis and management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) in primary care: a qualitative study
Implementing resources to support the diagnosis and management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) in primary care: a qualitative study
BACKGROUND: Previous research has highlighted that many GPs lack the confidence and knowledge to diagnose and manage people with CFS/ME. Following the development of an online training module for GPs, and an information pack and DVD for patients, this study explored the extent to which these resources can be implemented in routine primary care.

METHODS: Semi structured qualitative interviews were completed with patients and GPs across North West England. All interviews were transcribed and analysed using open exploratory thematic coding. Following this thematic analysis, the authors conducted a further theory-driven analysis of the data guided by Normalisation Process Theory.

RESULTS: When used in line with advice from the research team, the information resource and training were perceived as beneficial to both patients and GPs in the diagnosis and management of CFS/ME. However, 47 % of patients in this study did not receive the information pack from their GP. When the information pack was used, it was often incomplete, sent in the post, and GPs did not work with patients to discuss the materials. Only13 out of 21 practices completed the training module due to time pressures and the low priority placed on low prevalence, contentious, hard to manage conditions. When the module was completed, many GPs stated that it was not feasible to retain the key messages as they saw so few patients with the condition. Due to the complexity of the condition, GPs also believed that the diagnosis and management of CFS/ME should take place in a specialist care setting.

CONCLUSION: While barriers to the implementation of training and resources for CFS/ME remain, there is a need to support CFS/ME patients to access reliable, evidence based information outside primary care. Our findings suggest that future research should develop an online resource for patients to support self-management.
1471-2296
1-11
Bayliss, Kerin
95a08f53-b78b-443c-887f-010fcb4f67b0
Riste, Lisa
60ba986d-f8ac-4a44-bc56-ebdd68788587
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Peters, Sarah
ddff0896-ded8-4780-a426-c207e1ec6de8
Wearden, Alison
57425d54-35b4-450e-8deb-ab18cd7016dc
Lovell, Karina
5d35b37c-4545-4ba4-a66c-9d94e1e9e780
Fisher, Louise
af1b154e-e953-48e2-9d26-18d9920a641b
Chew-Graham, Carolyn
530beade-2b1c-4eea-846f-1fcef0585ca5
Bayliss, Kerin
95a08f53-b78b-443c-887f-010fcb4f67b0
Riste, Lisa
60ba986d-f8ac-4a44-bc56-ebdd68788587
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Peters, Sarah
ddff0896-ded8-4780-a426-c207e1ec6de8
Wearden, Alison
57425d54-35b4-450e-8deb-ab18cd7016dc
Lovell, Karina
5d35b37c-4545-4ba4-a66c-9d94e1e9e780
Fisher, Louise
af1b154e-e953-48e2-9d26-18d9920a641b
Chew-Graham, Carolyn
530beade-2b1c-4eea-846f-1fcef0585ca5

Bayliss, Kerin, Riste, Lisa, Band, Rebecca, Peters, Sarah, Wearden, Alison, Lovell, Karina, Fisher, Louise and Chew-Graham, Carolyn (2016) Implementing resources to support the diagnosis and management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) in primary care: a qualitative study. BMC Family Practice, 17 (66), 1-11. (doi:10.1186/s12875-016-0453-8). (PMID:27259658)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous research has highlighted that many GPs lack the confidence and knowledge to diagnose and manage people with CFS/ME. Following the development of an online training module for GPs, and an information pack and DVD for patients, this study explored the extent to which these resources can be implemented in routine primary care.

METHODS: Semi structured qualitative interviews were completed with patients and GPs across North West England. All interviews were transcribed and analysed using open exploratory thematic coding. Following this thematic analysis, the authors conducted a further theory-driven analysis of the data guided by Normalisation Process Theory.

RESULTS: When used in line with advice from the research team, the information resource and training were perceived as beneficial to both patients and GPs in the diagnosis and management of CFS/ME. However, 47 % of patients in this study did not receive the information pack from their GP. When the information pack was used, it was often incomplete, sent in the post, and GPs did not work with patients to discuss the materials. Only13 out of 21 practices completed the training module due to time pressures and the low priority placed on low prevalence, contentious, hard to manage conditions. When the module was completed, many GPs stated that it was not feasible to retain the key messages as they saw so few patients with the condition. Due to the complexity of the condition, GPs also believed that the diagnosis and management of CFS/ME should take place in a specialist care setting.

CONCLUSION: While barriers to the implementation of training and resources for CFS/ME remain, there is a need to support CFS/ME patients to access reliable, evidence based information outside primary care. Our findings suggest that future research should develop an online resource for patients to support self-management.

Text
art%3A10.1186%2Fs12875-016-0453-8.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (491kB)
Text
s12875-016-0453-8 - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 June 2016
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396460
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396460
ISSN: 1471-2296
PURE UUID: 65023230-af99-4a8c-8675-7c54bc8046fa
ORCID for Rebecca Band: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5403-1708

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 13:20
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:23

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×