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Geography and economic performance: exploratory spatial data analysis for Great Britain

Geography and economic performance: exploratory spatial data analysis for Great Britain
Geography and economic performance: exploratory spatial data analysis for Great Britain
This paper uses the techniques of exploratory spatial data analysis to analyse patterns of spatial association for different indicators of economic performance, and in so doing identify and describe the spatial structure of economic performance for Great Britain. This approach enables us to identify a number of significant local regimes – clusters of areas in which income per worker differs significantly from the global average – and investigate whether these come about primarily through spatial association in occupational composition or in productivity. Our results show that the contributions of occupational composition and productivity vary significantly across local regimes. The ‘winner’s circle’ of areas in the south and east of England benefits from both above average levels of productivity and better than average occupational composition, while the low income regime in the north of England suffers particularly from poor occupational composition.
regional disparities, income per worker, productivity, occupational composition, spatial autocorrelation
602
University of Southampton
Patacchini, Eleonora
42a2cbc9-016c-43f2-a9e9-e2f00172d919
Rice, Patricia
9fe65262-51ad-4deb-9b8f-cedc772ba186
Patacchini, Eleonora
42a2cbc9-016c-43f2-a9e9-e2f00172d919
Rice, Patricia
9fe65262-51ad-4deb-9b8f-cedc772ba186

Patacchini, Eleonora and Rice, Patricia (2005) Geography and economic performance: exploratory spatial data analysis for Great Britain (Discussion Papers in Economics and Econometrics, 602) Southampton, UK. University of Southampton 40pp.

Record type: Monograph (Discussion Paper)

Abstract

This paper uses the techniques of exploratory spatial data analysis to analyse patterns of spatial association for different indicators of economic performance, and in so doing identify and describe the spatial structure of economic performance for Great Britain. This approach enables us to identify a number of significant local regimes – clusters of areas in which income per worker differs significantly from the global average – and investigate whether these come about primarily through spatial association in occupational composition or in productivity. Our results show that the contributions of occupational composition and productivity vary significantly across local regimes. The ‘winner’s circle’ of areas in the south and east of England benefits from both above average levels of productivity and better than average occupational composition, while the low income regime in the north of England suffers particularly from poor occupational composition.

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More information

Published date: 2005
Additional Information: JEL Classification: O18, O4, R11, R12
Keywords: regional disparities, income per worker, productivity, occupational composition, spatial autocorrelation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 39651
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/39651
PURE UUID: 75f3cef5-d663-4180-8cd5-88e9ae54776b

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Date deposited: 29 Jun 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:36

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