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Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis

Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis
Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis
Background: Liver cirrhosis is a large burden on global health, causing over one million deaths per year. Observational studies have reported an inverse association between coffee and cirrhosis.

Aims: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to characterise the relationship between coffee consumption and cirrhosis.

Methods: We searched for studies published until July 2015 that reported odds ratios, relative risks (RR) or hazard ratios for cirrhosis stratified by coffee consumption. We calculated RRs of cirrhosis for an increase in daily coffee consumption of two cups for each study and overall. We performed analyses by study design, type of cirrhosis and mortality. We assessed the risk of bias in each study and the overall quality of evidence for the effect of coffee on cirrhosis.

Results: We identified five cohort studies and four case–control studies involving 1990 cases and 432 133 participants. We observed a dose–response in most studies and overall. The pooled RR of cirrhosis for a daily increase in coffee consumption of two cups was 0.56 (95% CI 0.44–0.68; I2 83.3%). The RR pooled from cohort studies for a daily increase of two cups was 0.58 (95% CI 0.41–0.76; I2 91.1%) and from case–control studies it was 0.52 (95% CI 0.40–0.63; I2 0.0%). The pooled RR of alcoholic cirrhosis for a daily increase of two cups was 0.62 (95% CI 0.51–0.73; I2 0%) and of death from cirrhosis it was 0.55 (95% CI 0.35–0.74; I2 90.3%).

Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that increasing coffee consumption may substantially reduce the risk of cirrhosis.
0269-2813
562-574
Kennedy, O.J.
96f5e8fc-f18e-4887-8504-77ffef83c7f1
Roderick, P.
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Buchanan, R.
9499f713-f684-4046-be29-83cd9d6f834d
Fallowfield, J.A.
5145347f-a7d0-40ea-b2d4-0b70dc1543ff
Hayes, P.C.
b11e932b-97fd-4ec5-bf52-53fef0625c60
Parkes, J.
59dc6de3-4018-415e-bb99-13552f97e984
Kennedy, O.J.
96f5e8fc-f18e-4887-8504-77ffef83c7f1
Roderick, P.
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Buchanan, R.
9499f713-f684-4046-be29-83cd9d6f834d
Fallowfield, J.A.
5145347f-a7d0-40ea-b2d4-0b70dc1543ff
Hayes, P.C.
b11e932b-97fd-4ec5-bf52-53fef0625c60
Parkes, J.
59dc6de3-4018-415e-bb99-13552f97e984

Kennedy, O.J., Roderick, P., Buchanan, R., Fallowfield, J.A., Hayes, P.C. and Parkes, J. (2016) Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 43 (5), 562-574. (doi:10.1111/apt.13523). (PMID:26806124)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Liver cirrhosis is a large burden on global health, causing over one million deaths per year. Observational studies have reported an inverse association between coffee and cirrhosis.

Aims: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to characterise the relationship between coffee consumption and cirrhosis.

Methods: We searched for studies published until July 2015 that reported odds ratios, relative risks (RR) or hazard ratios for cirrhosis stratified by coffee consumption. We calculated RRs of cirrhosis for an increase in daily coffee consumption of two cups for each study and overall. We performed analyses by study design, type of cirrhosis and mortality. We assessed the risk of bias in each study and the overall quality of evidence for the effect of coffee on cirrhosis.

Results: We identified five cohort studies and four case–control studies involving 1990 cases and 432 133 participants. We observed a dose–response in most studies and overall. The pooled RR of cirrhosis for a daily increase in coffee consumption of two cups was 0.56 (95% CI 0.44–0.68; I2 83.3%). The RR pooled from cohort studies for a daily increase of two cups was 0.58 (95% CI 0.41–0.76; I2 91.1%) and from case–control studies it was 0.52 (95% CI 0.40–0.63; I2 0.0%). The pooled RR of alcoholic cirrhosis for a daily increase of two cups was 0.62 (95% CI 0.51–0.73; I2 0%) and of death from cirrhosis it was 0.55 (95% CI 0.35–0.74; I2 90.3%).

Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that increasing coffee consumption may substantially reduce the risk of cirrhosis.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 January 2016
Published date: March 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396572
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396572
ISSN: 0269-2813
PURE UUID: 57ceeda7-0ebf-4e33-ba4e-502b257e1bc1
ORCID for P. Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850
ORCID for J. Parkes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6490-395X

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Date deposited: 13 Jun 2016 11:08
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:51

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Contributors

Author: O.J. Kennedy
Author: P. Roderick ORCID iD
Author: R. Buchanan
Author: J.A. Fallowfield
Author: P.C. Hayes
Author: J. Parkes ORCID iD

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