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Routine iron supplementation and anaemia by third trimester in a Nigerian hospital

Routine iron supplementation and anaemia by third trimester in a Nigerian hospital
Routine iron supplementation and anaemia by third trimester in a Nigerian hospital
Background

Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcome. Unfortunately, in developing countries its prevalence has continued to rise. To improve the situation, iron supplement is routinely prescribed during pregnancy. We therefore examine the impact of the intervention as being currently practised in our clinical setting.
Methods

In total, 255 prenatal clinic attendees who had more than 8 weeks of prescribed iron supplements were sampled. Data was obtained on their socio-demographic features, haemoglobin concentration at booking, compliance with iron supplements and third trimester haemoglobin value.
Results

Observed iron supplementation compliance rate was 184(72.2%). There was a significant drop in mean haemoglobin (Hb) concentration between the two time points (booking Hb: 32.56±2.99; third trimester Hb: 31.67±3.01; mean diff: 0.89±3.04; t = 4.673; 95% CI= 0.52–1.27; p= <0.001). Anaemia increased from 132(51.8%) to 150(58.8%) by the third trimester. Increase in anaemia occurred in both iron-compliant and non-compliant groups. Non-compliance however had higher odds of predicting anaemia by the third trimester (OR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.03–3.26; p: 0.04).
Conclusion

Although iron supplementation is still a good intervention in developing countries, it is not sufficient to reduce overall prevalence of anaemia by the third trimester. There is a need to look beyond the approach and reinforce the importance of better feeding practices, food fortification and reduced frequency of pregnancies.
Anaemia, pregnancy, iron supplementation, outcome, food fortification
1029-1857
305-312
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, J.O.
a574fcc8-af04-4532-9db5-14df542c3369
Olofinbiyi, B.A.
fd3fa6ce-635a-4177-8a99-fd8a5cc3b2e2
Adanikin, P.O.
bdf5a553-be00-4a84-80e7-e5e2602c3113
Ogundare, O.R.
35a20b52-a32a-4861-aece-a5a0fb0edbcc
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, J.O.
a574fcc8-af04-4532-9db5-14df542c3369
Olofinbiyi, B.A.
fd3fa6ce-635a-4177-8a99-fd8a5cc3b2e2
Adanikin, P.O.
bdf5a553-be00-4a84-80e7-e5e2602c3113
Ogundare, O.R.
35a20b52-a32a-4861-aece-a5a0fb0edbcc

Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu, Awoleke, J.O., Olofinbiyi, B.A., Adanikin, P.O. and Ogundare, O.R. (2015) Routine iron supplementation and anaemia by third trimester in a Nigerian hospital. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences, 25 (4), 305-312. (doi:10.4314/ejhs.v25i4.3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcome. Unfortunately, in developing countries its prevalence has continued to rise. To improve the situation, iron supplement is routinely prescribed during pregnancy. We therefore examine the impact of the intervention as being currently practised in our clinical setting.
Methods

In total, 255 prenatal clinic attendees who had more than 8 weeks of prescribed iron supplements were sampled. Data was obtained on their socio-demographic features, haemoglobin concentration at booking, compliance with iron supplements and third trimester haemoglobin value.
Results

Observed iron supplementation compliance rate was 184(72.2%). There was a significant drop in mean haemoglobin (Hb) concentration between the two time points (booking Hb: 32.56±2.99; third trimester Hb: 31.67±3.01; mean diff: 0.89±3.04; t = 4.673; 95% CI= 0.52–1.27; p= <0.001). Anaemia increased from 132(51.8%) to 150(58.8%) by the third trimester. Increase in anaemia occurred in both iron-compliant and non-compliant groups. Non-compliance however had higher odds of predicting anaemia by the third trimester (OR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.03–3.26; p: 0.04).
Conclusion

Although iron supplementation is still a good intervention in developing countries, it is not sufficient to reduce overall prevalence of anaemia by the third trimester. There is a need to look beyond the approach and reinforce the importance of better feeding practices, food fortification and reduced frequency of pregnancies.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2015
Keywords: Anaemia, pregnancy, iron supplementation, outcome, food fortification
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396627
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396627
ISSN: 1029-1857
PURE UUID: 4424751a-ab8a-42cb-aa87-395c2f7ea201

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 11:22
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:22

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