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Awareness and practice of emergency contraception at a private university in Nigeria

Awareness and practice of emergency contraception at a private university in Nigeria
Awareness and practice of emergency contraception at a private university in Nigeria
The pursuit of formal education now causes many people in developing countries to marry later in life, thereby leading to increased premarital sex and unintended pregnancies. Efforts have been made to characterize awareness and use of emergency contraception (EC) among undergraduate students in public universities in Nigeria; however, it is not known if students in private tertiary institutions adopt different practices or if having an affluent family background plays a role. This pilot study therefore aimed to assess the awareness and use of EC among students at a private Nigerian university toward assisting education planners in developing strategies in improving students’ reproductive well-being.
Results

Out of 94 female students, 42 (44.7%) had sexual experience, but only 32 (34.0%) were currently sexually active. Six students (6.4%) had had unwanted pregnancies, of which all but one were terminated. Fifty-seven respondents (60.6%) were aware of EC, though only 10 (10.6%) ever practiced it. The greatest source of EC information was from health workers and peers; the lowest source was family or relatives. Most respondents desired orientation and availability of EC on campus. EC awareness among the students was predicted by upper social class background (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–7.45) and upbringing in the Federal Capital Territory (adjusted OR, 4.45; 95% CI, 1.56–14.22).
Conclusions

Though awareness of EC was higher among the private university students in this study than at most public universities, there was no difference in EC usage. A high pregnancy termination rate was observed; dilatation and curettage were mainly adopted. In Nigeria, youth-friendly reproductive health information and access should not be limited to government-owned tertiary institutions but also extended to private ones.
Africa, student, undergraduate, private university, emergency contraception
1756-0500
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, Adeola
00ace4bd-7c25-403a-bab6-235c04dfc260
Odanye, Moyinoluwa
c7b56d73-db90-45b6-8aa3-9ee758f9f05d
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, Adeola
00ace4bd-7c25-403a-bab6-235c04dfc260
Odanye, Moyinoluwa
c7b56d73-db90-45b6-8aa3-9ee758f9f05d

Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa, Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu, Awoleke, Adeola and Odanye, Moyinoluwa (2015) Awareness and practice of emergency contraception at a private university in Nigeria. BMC Research Notes, 8 (1). (doi:10.1186/s13104-015-1204-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The pursuit of formal education now causes many people in developing countries to marry later in life, thereby leading to increased premarital sex and unintended pregnancies. Efforts have been made to characterize awareness and use of emergency contraception (EC) among undergraduate students in public universities in Nigeria; however, it is not known if students in private tertiary institutions adopt different practices or if having an affluent family background plays a role. This pilot study therefore aimed to assess the awareness and use of EC among students at a private Nigerian university toward assisting education planners in developing strategies in improving students’ reproductive well-being.
Results

Out of 94 female students, 42 (44.7%) had sexual experience, but only 32 (34.0%) were currently sexually active. Six students (6.4%) had had unwanted pregnancies, of which all but one were terminated. Fifty-seven respondents (60.6%) were aware of EC, though only 10 (10.6%) ever practiced it. The greatest source of EC information was from health workers and peers; the lowest source was family or relatives. Most respondents desired orientation and availability of EC on campus. EC awareness among the students was predicted by upper social class background (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–7.45) and upbringing in the Federal Capital Territory (adjusted OR, 4.45; 95% CI, 1.56–14.22).
Conclusions

Though awareness of EC was higher among the private university students in this study than at most public universities, there was no difference in EC usage. A high pregnancy termination rate was observed; dilatation and curettage were mainly adopted. In Nigeria, youth-friendly reproductive health information and access should not be limited to government-owned tertiary institutions but also extended to private ones.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 4 June 2015
Keywords: Africa, student, undergraduate, private university, emergency contraception
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396628
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396628
ISSN: 1756-0500
PURE UUID: 5b9bb9a6-baaa-4fe3-87b2-a633aa685e80

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 11:28
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:22

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