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Sociodemographic factors associated with anaemia in pregnancy at booking for antenatal care

Sociodemographic factors associated with anaemia in pregnancy at booking for antenatal care
Sociodemographic factors associated with anaemia in pregnancy at booking for antenatal care
Late patronage of antenatal care by women in low-resource areas makes timely intervention at correcting anaemia difficult. This study aimed to identify modifiable sociodemographic factors that predict anaemia before commencing antenatal care and make appropriate recommendation. A survey of sociodemographic features and haemoglobin concentrations of 232 women booking for antenatal care was conducted. Anaemia was diagnosed in 119 (51.3%), of which 87 (37.5%) had mild anaemia and 32 (13.8%) were moderately anaemic. There was no severe anaemia. Anaemia was highest among respondents who were ? 35 years of age, Muslims, of Igbo ethnicity (64.3%), single (55.0%), student/unemployed (58.8%), nulliparous (57.3%) and those who registered at ? 21 weeks’ gestation (54.2%). Only occupation of the woman showed association with anaemia before antenatal care (p = 0.007). A personal source of income may reduce anaemia in pregnancy; and it is advisable to have a social welfare package for unemployed pregnant women.
Anaemia, pregnancy, antenatal care, demographic features
0144-3615
44-47
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, J. O.
fa562e39-afea-4ec5-9012-eb0a23e10c5d
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, J. O.
fa562e39-afea-4ec5-9012-eb0a23e10c5d

Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu and Awoleke, J. O. (2016) Sociodemographic factors associated with anaemia in pregnancy at booking for antenatal care. Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 36 (1), 44-47. (doi:10.3109/01443615.2015.1025727).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Late patronage of antenatal care by women in low-resource areas makes timely intervention at correcting anaemia difficult. This study aimed to identify modifiable sociodemographic factors that predict anaemia before commencing antenatal care and make appropriate recommendation. A survey of sociodemographic features and haemoglobin concentrations of 232 women booking for antenatal care was conducted. Anaemia was diagnosed in 119 (51.3%), of which 87 (37.5%) had mild anaemia and 32 (13.8%) were moderately anaemic. There was no severe anaemia. Anaemia was highest among respondents who were ? 35 years of age, Muslims, of Igbo ethnicity (64.3%), single (55.0%), student/unemployed (58.8%), nulliparous (57.3%) and those who registered at ? 21 weeks’ gestation (54.2%). Only occupation of the woman showed association with anaemia before antenatal care (p = 0.007). A personal source of income may reduce anaemia in pregnancy; and it is advisable to have a social welfare package for unemployed pregnant women.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 27 July 2015
Published date: 2016
Keywords: Anaemia, pregnancy, antenatal care, demographic features
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396629
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396629
ISSN: 0144-3615
PURE UUID: 44ab05a2-905d-4db3-bbca-95bfede3b1b3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 11:59
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:22

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