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Ruptured tubal pregnancy: predictors of delays in seeking and obtaining care in a Nigerian population

Ruptured tubal pregnancy: predictors of delays in seeking and obtaining care in a Nigerian population
Ruptured tubal pregnancy: predictors of delays in seeking and obtaining care in a Nigerian population
Purpose: Morbidity and mortality from ruptured tubal pregnancies (RTPs) have been linked with delays in seeking and receiving care. Evaluation of the reasons for these delays and their contributions to maternal deaths is rarely done for women with RTPs in resource-constrained settings.
Patients and methods: This was a 3-year retrospective review of the case records of women with tubal pregnancies managed at the Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Clinical and sociodemographic parameters were obtained, including information on onset of symptoms and intervals between the symptoms and when help was sought and obtained at the hospital.
Results: There were 92 cases of tubal pregnancies, giving an incidence of 18 per 1,000 births. Most of the patients were married (74.7%), parous (64.9%), and urban dwellers (76.9%), and 11% were severely anemic on arrival. The case-fatality rate was 1.1% and 74.7% had delay in seeking care, while 82.4% of the women spent more than 2 hours after admission before surgical intervention. Rural dwellers (adjusted odds ratio 2.96, 95% confidence interval 1.08–8.36) and those without formal education (adjusted odds ratio 6.39, 95% confidence interval 1.06–67.30) had delays in seeking help, while problems with funds (?2=7.354, P=0.005) and initial misdiagnosis (?2=5.824, P=0.018) predicted delay in obtaining help at the hospital.
Conclusion: RTPs are common gynecological emergencies in our environment that are often associated with delayed decisions to seek help and obtain care. Efforts should be geared toward women’s education and financial independence, improved hospital accessibility, and better diagnostic skills.
141-147
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, Adeola
00ace4bd-7c25-403a-bab6-235c04dfc260
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, Adeola
00ace4bd-7c25-403a-bab6-235c04dfc260

Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa, Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu and Awoleke, Adeola (2015) Ruptured tubal pregnancy: predictors of delays in seeking and obtaining care in a Nigerian population. International Journal of Women's Health, 7, 141-147. (doi:10.2147/IJWH.S76837).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: Morbidity and mortality from ruptured tubal pregnancies (RTPs) have been linked with delays in seeking and receiving care. Evaluation of the reasons for these delays and their contributions to maternal deaths is rarely done for women with RTPs in resource-constrained settings.
Patients and methods: This was a 3-year retrospective review of the case records of women with tubal pregnancies managed at the Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Clinical and sociodemographic parameters were obtained, including information on onset of symptoms and intervals between the symptoms and when help was sought and obtained at the hospital.
Results: There were 92 cases of tubal pregnancies, giving an incidence of 18 per 1,000 births. Most of the patients were married (74.7%), parous (64.9%), and urban dwellers (76.9%), and 11% were severely anemic on arrival. The case-fatality rate was 1.1% and 74.7% had delay in seeking care, while 82.4% of the women spent more than 2 hours after admission before surgical intervention. Rural dwellers (adjusted odds ratio 2.96, 95% confidence interval 1.08–8.36) and those without formal education (adjusted odds ratio 6.39, 95% confidence interval 1.06–67.30) had delays in seeking help, while problems with funds (?2=7.354, P=0.005) and initial misdiagnosis (?2=5.824, P=0.018) predicted delay in obtaining help at the hospital.
Conclusion: RTPs are common gynecological emergencies in our environment that are often associated with delayed decisions to seek help and obtain care. Efforts should be geared toward women’s education and financial independence, improved hospital accessibility, and better diagnostic skills.

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Published date: 27 January 2015
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

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Local EPrints ID: 396644
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396644
PURE UUID: fd41e945-04f6-4334-8d8a-d3f41f0704f1

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Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 13:06
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:22

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