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Predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in a low-resource setting

Predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in a low-resource setting
Predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in a low-resource setting
This study aims at identifying predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) among pregnant women in a low-resource setting, with the intent of recommending a guideline for screening during antenatal care. A total of 266 healthy pregnant women were antenatally recruited after informed consent. They had routine antenatal investigations, a 1 h 50-g oral glucose tolerance test and quantitative urine culture and sensitivity. The data collected were analysed using statistical software package SPSS v. 17. Prevalence of AB was 23 (8.6%). Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (6, 26.1%), closely followed by Staphylococcus aureus (5, 21.7%). AB was commoner among patients aged 25-34 years, of low parity and higher education. Blood group B- rhesus-positive significantly predicts the likelihood of developing AB in pregnancy (adjusted OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14-0.96). We conclude that blood group B-rhesus-positive in association with other patients' characteristics, such as age 25-34 years, low parity and higher education could form guidelines for a screening algorithm in our environment.
Asymptomatic bacteriuria, pregnancy, screening
0144-3615
25-29
Awoleke, J.O.
a574fcc8-af04-4532-9db5-14df542c3369
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Ajayi, D.D.
b79320ea-619f-452b-b662-a9f18d806fe3
Ayosanmi, O.S.
938d7b60-e155-4c38-9f14-5938ad49a276
Awoleke, J.O.
a574fcc8-af04-4532-9db5-14df542c3369
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Ajayi, D.D.
b79320ea-619f-452b-b662-a9f18d806fe3
Ayosanmi, O.S.
938d7b60-e155-4c38-9f14-5938ad49a276

Awoleke, J.O., Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu, Ajayi, D.D. and Ayosanmi, O.S. (2015) Predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in a low-resource setting. Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 35 (1), 25-29. (doi:10.3109/01443615.2014.935724). (PMID:25029095)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study aims at identifying predictors of asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) among pregnant women in a low-resource setting, with the intent of recommending a guideline for screening during antenatal care. A total of 266 healthy pregnant women were antenatally recruited after informed consent. They had routine antenatal investigations, a 1 h 50-g oral glucose tolerance test and quantitative urine culture and sensitivity. The data collected were analysed using statistical software package SPSS v. 17. Prevalence of AB was 23 (8.6%). Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (6, 26.1%), closely followed by Staphylococcus aureus (5, 21.7%). AB was commoner among patients aged 25-34 years, of low parity and higher education. Blood group B- rhesus-positive significantly predicts the likelihood of developing AB in pregnancy (adjusted OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14-0.96). We conclude that blood group B-rhesus-positive in association with other patients' characteristics, such as age 25-34 years, low parity and higher education could form guidelines for a screening algorithm in our environment.

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Published date: January 2015
Keywords: Asymptomatic bacteriuria, pregnancy, screening
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

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Local EPrints ID: 396645
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396645
ISSN: 0144-3615
PURE UUID: c0eb462d-d610-4425-a5c5-c187c270d4b3

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Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 13:12
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:22

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Contributors

Author: J.O. Awoleke
Author: D.D. Ajayi
Author: O.S. Ayosanmi

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