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Reshaping maternal services in Nigeria: any need for spiritual care?

Reshaping maternal services in Nigeria: any need for spiritual care?
Reshaping maternal services in Nigeria: any need for spiritual care?
BACKGROUND:

High maternal and perinatal mortalities occur from deliveries conducted in prayer houses in Nigeria. Although some regulatory efforts have been deployed to tackle this problem, less attention has been placed on the possible motivation for seeking prayer house intervention which could be hinged on the spiritual belief of patients about pregnancy and childbirth. This study therefore seeks to determine the perception of booked antenatal patients on spiritual care during pregnancy and their desire for such within hospital setting.
METHOD:

A total of 397 antenatal attendees from two tertiary health institutions in southwest Nigeria were sampled. A pretested questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio-demographic features of respondents, perception of spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth; and how they desire that their spiritual needs are addressed. Responses were subsequently collated and analyzed.
RESULTS:

Most of the women, 301 (75.8%), believe there is a need for spiritual help during pregnancy and childbirth. About half (48.5%) were currently seeking for help in prayer/mission houses while another 8.6% still intended to. Overwhelmingly, 281 (70.8%) felt it was needful for health professionals to consider their spiritual needs. Most respondents, 257 (64.7%), desired that their clergy is allowed to pray with them while in labour and sees such collaboration as incentive that will improve hospital patronage. There was association between high family income and desire for collaboration of healthcare providers with one's clergy (OR 1.82; CI 1.03-3.21; p?=?0.04).
CONCLUSION:

Our women desire spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth. Its incorporation into maternal health services will improve hospital delivery rates.
1471-2393
196
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Onwudiegwu, Uche
c6670f47-5b59-40eb-a797-d574ca33ee8c
Akintayo, Akinyemi A
4780419b-0295-4378-91d3-635d250ee3f5
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Onwudiegwu, Uche
c6670f47-5b59-40eb-a797-d574ca33ee8c
Akintayo, Akinyemi A
4780419b-0295-4378-91d3-635d250ee3f5

Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu, Onwudiegwu, Uche and Akintayo, Akinyemi A (2014) Reshaping maternal services in Nigeria: any need for spiritual care? BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 14 (1), 196. (doi:10.1186/1471-2393-14-196).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High maternal and perinatal mortalities occur from deliveries conducted in prayer houses in Nigeria. Although some regulatory efforts have been deployed to tackle this problem, less attention has been placed on the possible motivation for seeking prayer house intervention which could be hinged on the spiritual belief of patients about pregnancy and childbirth. This study therefore seeks to determine the perception of booked antenatal patients on spiritual care during pregnancy and their desire for such within hospital setting.
METHOD:

A total of 397 antenatal attendees from two tertiary health institutions in southwest Nigeria were sampled. A pretested questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio-demographic features of respondents, perception of spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth; and how they desire that their spiritual needs are addressed. Responses were subsequently collated and analyzed.
RESULTS:

Most of the women, 301 (75.8%), believe there is a need for spiritual help during pregnancy and childbirth. About half (48.5%) were currently seeking for help in prayer/mission houses while another 8.6% still intended to. Overwhelmingly, 281 (70.8%) felt it was needful for health professionals to consider their spiritual needs. Most respondents, 257 (64.7%), desired that their clergy is allowed to pray with them while in labour and sees such collaboration as incentive that will improve hospital patronage. There was association between high family income and desire for collaboration of healthcare providers with one's clergy (OR 1.82; CI 1.03-3.21; p?=?0.04).
CONCLUSION:

Our women desire spiritual care during pregnancy and childbirth. Its incorporation into maternal health services will improve hospital delivery rates.

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More information

Published date: 2014
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396650
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396650
ISSN: 1471-2393
PURE UUID: 21145af3-569a-4831-af25-7dd963c637bb

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2016 13:24
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 04:47

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Contributors

Author: Abiodun, Idowu Adanikin
Author: Uche Onwudiegwu
Author: Akinyemi A Akintayo

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