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Creating opportunities to learn social skills at school using digital games

Creating opportunities to learn social skills at school using digital games
Creating opportunities to learn social skills at school using digital games
Acquiring skills for social and emotional well-being is important for inclusive societies and academic achievement. Studies have demonstrated the beneficial link between prosocial behaviours and improved results in curriculum topics. This paper describes a Prosocial Learning (PSL) process for creation and delivery of digital games for children (7-10 yrs) within educational systems that support learning of prosocial skills. The approach combines prosocial pedagogies with advanced ICT technologies and cloud delivery models to create attractive and exciting learning opportunities for children; produce novel digital game-based pedagogies and simplify deployment.
Prosociality is a concept that refers to an individual’s propensity towards positive social behaviours. Individuals with prosocial skills are, for example, able to join in conversations, talk nicely, identifying feelings and emotions in themselves and others, identify someone needs help and ask for help. PSL classifies these skills in terms of Friendship, Feelings and Cooperation. By using interactive digital games supported by additional instructive and reflective activities, PSL allows children to learn social skills that can be generalised to real life situations in the classroom, playground and at home.
PSL is implemented through a technology platform offering systematic pedagogical support for prosocial games developed by an ecosystem of teachers and games companies. Capabilities include multi-modal sensors to observe emotional affect, game interaction and decision-making. Information is acquired through standard protocols (e.g. xAPI) and evaluated by learning analytics algorithms to provide real-time feedback on player behaviours that are be used for in-game feedback and adaptation, and by teachers to shape follow-up activities. PSL is validated through short and longitudinal studies at European schools to gather evidence for effectiveness. This paper provides early evidence from short studies that will steer larger pan-European trials to test hypotheses, promote to policy makers and to increase adoption of game-based learning in schools
461-469
Academic Conferences Ltd
Modafferi, Stefano
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Boniface, Michael
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Crowle, Simon
bee1e5f6-1d8d-4dc7-8312-622b7b1c89f8
Star, Kam
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Middleton, Lee
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Connolly, Thomas
Boyle, Liz
Modafferi, Stefano
2f15a6fa-a4c3-4f43-998f-df7d88f08a78
Boniface, Michael
f30bfd7d-20ed-451b-b405-34e3e22fdfba
Crowle, Simon
bee1e5f6-1d8d-4dc7-8312-622b7b1c89f8
Star, Kam
2462fed5-681e-4be9-9449-3de81c727244
Middleton, Lee
f165a2fa-1a66-4d84-9c58-0cdaa8e73272
Connolly, Thomas
Boyle, Liz

Modafferi, Stefano, Boniface, Michael, Crowle, Simon, Star, Kam and Middleton, Lee (2017) Creating opportunities to learn social skills at school using digital games. Connolly, Thomas and Boyle, Liz (eds.) In 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning (ECGBL 2016) : Paisley, United Kingdom, 6-7 October 2016. Academic Conferences Ltd. pp. 461-469 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Acquiring skills for social and emotional well-being is important for inclusive societies and academic achievement. Studies have demonstrated the beneficial link between prosocial behaviours and improved results in curriculum topics. This paper describes a Prosocial Learning (PSL) process for creation and delivery of digital games for children (7-10 yrs) within educational systems that support learning of prosocial skills. The approach combines prosocial pedagogies with advanced ICT technologies and cloud delivery models to create attractive and exciting learning opportunities for children; produce novel digital game-based pedagogies and simplify deployment.
Prosociality is a concept that refers to an individual’s propensity towards positive social behaviours. Individuals with prosocial skills are, for example, able to join in conversations, talk nicely, identifying feelings and emotions in themselves and others, identify someone needs help and ask for help. PSL classifies these skills in terms of Friendship, Feelings and Cooperation. By using interactive digital games supported by additional instructive and reflective activities, PSL allows children to learn social skills that can be generalised to real life situations in the classroom, playground and at home.
PSL is implemented through a technology platform offering systematic pedagogical support for prosocial games developed by an ecosystem of teachers and games companies. Capabilities include multi-modal sensors to observe emotional affect, game interaction and decision-making. Information is acquired through standard protocols (e.g. xAPI) and evaluated by learning analytics algorithms to provide real-time feedback on player behaviours that are be used for in-game feedback and adaptation, and by teachers to shape follow-up activities. PSL is validated through short and longitudinal studies at European schools to gather evidence for effectiveness. This paper provides early evidence from short studies that will steer larger pan-European trials to test hypotheses, promote to policy makers and to increase adoption of game-based learning in schools

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 May 2016
Published date: January 2017
Venue - Dates: European Conference on Games Based Learning (ECGBL) 2016, Paisley, United Kingdom, 2016-10-05 - 2016-10-06
Organisations: IT Innovation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396901
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396901
PURE UUID: 9dc33949-0641-4e0f-83ca-0b1bf229e871

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Date deposited: 16 Jun 2016 13:33
Last modified: 06 Aug 2020 16:34

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Contributors

Author: Stefano Modafferi
Author: Michael Boniface
Author: Simon Crowle
Author: Kam Star
Author: Lee Middleton
Editor: Thomas Connolly
Editor: Liz Boyle

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