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Game theoretic treatments for the differentiation of functional roles in the transition to multicellularity

Game theoretic treatments for the differentiation of functional roles in the transition to multicellularity
Game theoretic treatments for the differentiation of functional roles in the transition to multicellularity
Multicellular organisms are characterised by role specialisation, brought about by the epigenetic differentiation of their constituent parts. Conventional game theoretic studies of cooperation do not account for this division of labour, nor do they allow for the possibility of the plastic expression of phenotype. We address these issues by extending the notion of cooperative dilemmas to account for such interaction in which heterogeneous roles are advantageous and present an extended dynamical model of selection that allows for the possibility of conditional expression of phenotype. We use these models to investigate systematically when selection will favour an adaptive diversification of roles. We argue that such extensions to models and concepts are necessary to understand the origins of multicellularity and development.
0022-5193
161-173
Tudge, Simon J.
302f675d-7164-47e0-96b0-c85c1f48fddc
Watson, Richard A.
ce199dfc-d5d4-4edf-bd7b-f9e224c96c75
Brede, Markus
bbd03865-8e0b-4372-b9d7-cd549631f3f7
Tudge, Simon J.
302f675d-7164-47e0-96b0-c85c1f48fddc
Watson, Richard A.
ce199dfc-d5d4-4edf-bd7b-f9e224c96c75
Brede, Markus
bbd03865-8e0b-4372-b9d7-cd549631f3f7

Tudge, Simon J., Watson, Richard A. and Brede, Markus (2016) Game theoretic treatments for the differentiation of functional roles in the transition to multicellularity. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 395, 161-173. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.01.041).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Multicellular organisms are characterised by role specialisation, brought about by the epigenetic differentiation of their constituent parts. Conventional game theoretic studies of cooperation do not account for this division of labour, nor do they allow for the possibility of the plastic expression of phenotype. We address these issues by extending the notion of cooperative dilemmas to account for such interaction in which heterogeneous roles are advantageous and present an extended dynamical model of selection that allows for the possibility of conditional expression of phenotype. We use these models to investigate systematically when selection will favour an adaptive diversification of roles. We argue that such extensions to models and concepts are necessary to understand the origins of multicellularity and development.

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 February 2016
Published date: 21 April 2016
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 397034
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397034
ISSN: 0022-5193
PURE UUID: 8c488a9a-2323-4edc-90e0-dc75c68f7eeb

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Date deposited: 27 Jun 2016 10:20
Last modified: 09 Dec 2019 19:34

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