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A moving target, the usual suspects and (maybe) a smoking gun: the problem of pinning blame on modern genocide

A moving target, the usual suspects and (maybe) a smoking gun: the problem of pinning blame on modern genocide
A moving target, the usual suspects and (maybe) a smoking gun: the problem of pinning blame on modern genocide
In 1933 the army of the nascent Iraqi state launched an exterminatory attack on members of the Assyrian community who had fled to Iraq during the First World War. 'The Assyrian affair' which at the time sent shock-waves around the world has now been largely forgotten. But an examination of its origins and causation reveals much about the nature and pattern of modern genocide. Levene argues that typecasting genocide as the outcome of prejudice, racism or even xenophobia, while these may be significant ingredients, proves to be insufficient as a comprehensive explanation. Rather, these factors need to be analysed within the context of an emerging international system of nation-states. This itself may be a factor in helping to catalyse the most extreme and radically ideological responses, especially from new and untried national elites seeking to overcome perceived obstacles to their state's development and genuine independence.
arab, assyrian, assyrian affair, ethnic, genocide, hakkari, imperialism, iraq, kurd, nationalism, nation-state, prejudice, racism, turkey
0031-322X
3-24
Levene, Mark
4ad83ded-d4b9-40eb-a795-b2382a9a296a
Levene, Mark
4ad83ded-d4b9-40eb-a795-b2382a9a296a

Levene, Mark (1999) A moving target, the usual suspects and (maybe) a smoking gun: the problem of pinning blame on modern genocide. Patterns of Prejudice, 33 (4), 3-24. (doi:10.1080/003132299128810678).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In 1933 the army of the nascent Iraqi state launched an exterminatory attack on members of the Assyrian community who had fled to Iraq during the First World War. 'The Assyrian affair' which at the time sent shock-waves around the world has now been largely forgotten. But an examination of its origins and causation reveals much about the nature and pattern of modern genocide. Levene argues that typecasting genocide as the outcome of prejudice, racism or even xenophobia, while these may be significant ingredients, proves to be insufficient as a comprehensive explanation. Rather, these factors need to be analysed within the context of an emerging international system of nation-states. This itself may be a factor in helping to catalyse the most extreme and radically ideological responses, especially from new and untried national elites seeking to overcome perceived obstacles to their state's development and genuine independence.

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More information

Published date: 1999
Keywords: arab, assyrian, assyrian affair, ethnic, genocide, hakkari, imperialism, iraq, kurd, nationalism, nation-state, prejudice, racism, turkey
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 397057
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397057
ISSN: 0031-322X
PURE UUID: 2d3106a6-06d9-4ad1-8aad-67bc7f66dab5

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Date deposited: 26 Jul 2016 11:54
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:21

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