The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Vehicular fog computing: a viewpoint of vehicles as the infrastructures

Vehicular fog computing: a viewpoint of vehicles as the infrastructures
Vehicular fog computing: a viewpoint of vehicles as the infrastructures
With the emergence of ever-growing advanced vehicular applications, the challenges to meet the demands from both communication and computation are increasingly prominent. Without powerful communication and computational support, various vehicular applications and services will still stay in the concept phase and cannot be put into practice in the daily life. Thus, solving this problem is of great importance. The existing solutions, such as cellular networks, roadside units (RSUs), andmobile cloud computing, are far from perfect because they highly depend on and bear the cost of additional infrastructure deployment. Given tremendous number of vehicles in urban areas, putting these underutilized vehicular resources into use offers great opportunity and value. Therefore, we conceive the idea of utilizing vehicles as the infrastructures for communication and computation, named vehicular fog computing (VFC), which is an architecture that utilizes a collaborative multitude of end-user clients or near-user edge devices to carry out communication and computation, based on better utilization of individual communication and computational resources of each vehicle. By aggregating abundant resources of individual vehicles, the quality of services and applications can be enhanced greatly. In particular, by discussing four types of scenarios of moving and parked vehicles as the communication and computational infrastructures, we carry on a quantitative analysis of the capacities of VFC. We unveil an interesting relationship among the communication capability, connectivity, andmobility of vehicles, and we also find out the characteristics about the pattern of parking behavior, which benefits from the understanding of utilizing the vehicular resources. Finally, we discuss the challenges and open problems in implementing the proposed VFC system as the infrastructures. Our study provides insights for this novel promising paradigm, as well as research topics about vehicular information infrastructures.
0018-9545
3860-3873
Hou, Xueshi
8301abf7-6362-403b-abd0-671025d60de3
Li, Yong
0817e950-114f-47f3-aefe-74bf9ec0e2a3
Chen, Min
8ba2b581-ac04-4528-bbfe-7daf7f18bd75
Wu, Di
91a701bd-7ae2-4c61-af89-1d300e3671fd
Jin, Depeng
d5ef5d7e-82a7-4950-85cf-800fe7794cc5
Chen, Sheng
9310a111-f79a-48b8-98c7-383ca93cbb80
Hou, Xueshi
8301abf7-6362-403b-abd0-671025d60de3
Li, Yong
0817e950-114f-47f3-aefe-74bf9ec0e2a3
Chen, Min
8ba2b581-ac04-4528-bbfe-7daf7f18bd75
Wu, Di
91a701bd-7ae2-4c61-af89-1d300e3671fd
Jin, Depeng
d5ef5d7e-82a7-4950-85cf-800fe7794cc5
Chen, Sheng
9310a111-f79a-48b8-98c7-383ca93cbb80

Hou, Xueshi, Li, Yong, Chen, Min, Wu, Di, Jin, Depeng and Chen, Sheng (2016) Vehicular fog computing: a viewpoint of vehicles as the infrastructures. IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, 65 (6), 3860-3873. (doi:10.1109/TVT.2016.2532863).

Record type: Article

Abstract

With the emergence of ever-growing advanced vehicular applications, the challenges to meet the demands from both communication and computation are increasingly prominent. Without powerful communication and computational support, various vehicular applications and services will still stay in the concept phase and cannot be put into practice in the daily life. Thus, solving this problem is of great importance. The existing solutions, such as cellular networks, roadside units (RSUs), andmobile cloud computing, are far from perfect because they highly depend on and bear the cost of additional infrastructure deployment. Given tremendous number of vehicles in urban areas, putting these underutilized vehicular resources into use offers great opportunity and value. Therefore, we conceive the idea of utilizing vehicles as the infrastructures for communication and computation, named vehicular fog computing (VFC), which is an architecture that utilizes a collaborative multitude of end-user clients or near-user edge devices to carry out communication and computation, based on better utilization of individual communication and computational resources of each vehicle. By aggregating abundant resources of individual vehicles, the quality of services and applications can be enhanced greatly. In particular, by discussing four types of scenarios of moving and parked vehicles as the communication and computational infrastructures, we carry on a quantitative analysis of the capacities of VFC. We unveil an interesting relationship among the communication capability, connectivity, andmobility of vehicles, and we also find out the characteristics about the pattern of parking behavior, which benefits from the understanding of utilizing the vehicular resources. Finally, we discuss the challenges and open problems in implementing the proposed VFC system as the infrastructures. Our study provides insights for this novel promising paradigm, as well as research topics about vehicular information infrastructures.

Text
TVT2016-6.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 February 2016
Published date: June 2016
Organisations: Southampton Wireless Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 397450
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397450
ISSN: 0018-9545
PURE UUID: 9b82cb5b-734f-418f-885e-b74ea0192e9d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Jul 2016 10:25
Last modified: 14 Sep 2021 19:57

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×