The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Association between maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and offspring cognitive function during childhood and adolescence; a systematic review

Association between maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and offspring cognitive function during childhood and adolescence; a systematic review
Association between maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and offspring cognitive function during childhood and adolescence; a systematic review
Background The mother is the only source of nutrition for fetal growth including brain development. Maternal nutritional status (anthropometry, macro- and micro-nutrients) before and/or during pregnancy is therefore a potential predictor of offspring cognitive function. The relationship of maternal nutrition to offspring cognitive function is unclear. This review aims to assess existing evidence linking maternal nutritional status with offspring cognitive function. Methods Exposures considered were maternal BMI, height and weight, micronutrient status (vitamins D, B12, folate and iron) and macronutrient intakes (carbohydrate, protein and fat). The outcome was any measure of cognitive function in children aged <18 years. We considered observational studies and trials with allocation groups that differed by single nutrients. We searched Medline/PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases and reference lists of retrieved literature. Two reviewers independently extracted data from relevant articles. We used methods recommended by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Results Of 16,143 articles identified, 38 met inclusion criteria. Most studies were observational, and from high-income settings. There were few randomized controlled trials. There was consistent evidence linking maternal obesity with lower cognitive function in children; low maternal BMI has been inadequately studied. Among three studies of maternal vitamin D status, two showed lower cognitive function in children of deficient mothers. One trial of folic acid supplementation showed no effects on the children’s cognitive function and evidence from 13 observational studies was mixed. Among seven studies of maternal vitamin B12 status, most showed no association, though two studies in highly deficient populations suggested a possible effect. Four out of six observational studies and two trials (including one in an Iron deficient population) found no association of maternal iron status with offspring cognitive function. One trial of maternal carbohydrate/protein supplementation showed no effects on offspring cognitive function. Conclusions Current evidence that maternal nutritional status during pregnancy as defined by BMI, single micronutrient studies, or macronutrient intakes influences offspring cognitive function is inconclusive. There is a need for more trials especially in populations with high rates of maternal undernutrition. Systematic review registration Registered in PROSPERO CRD42013005702.
1471-2393
1-24
Veena, Sargoor R.
549cbba2-5ac1-4088-be37-4c1e656bddea
Gale, Catharine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Krishnaveni, Ghattu V.
cd20fca7-d151-43b7-a7b4-d6051d6dd922
Kehoe, Sarah H.
534e5729-632b-4b4f-8401-164d8c20aa26
Srinivasan, Krishnamachari
a5367aa3-c40e-4c3c-825e-2d150a3e40c5
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Veena, Sargoor R.
549cbba2-5ac1-4088-be37-4c1e656bddea
Gale, Catharine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Krishnaveni, Ghattu V.
cd20fca7-d151-43b7-a7b4-d6051d6dd922
Kehoe, Sarah H.
534e5729-632b-4b4f-8401-164d8c20aa26
Srinivasan, Krishnamachari
a5367aa3-c40e-4c3c-825e-2d150a3e40c5
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18

Veena, Sargoor R., Gale, Catharine R., Krishnaveni, Ghattu V., Kehoe, Sarah H., Srinivasan, Krishnamachari and Fall, Caroline H.D. (2016) Association between maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and offspring cognitive function during childhood and adolescence; a systematic review. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 16 (220), 1-24. (doi:10.1186/s12884-016-1011-z).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background The mother is the only source of nutrition for fetal growth including brain development. Maternal nutritional status (anthropometry, macro- and micro-nutrients) before and/or during pregnancy is therefore a potential predictor of offspring cognitive function. The relationship of maternal nutrition to offspring cognitive function is unclear. This review aims to assess existing evidence linking maternal nutritional status with offspring cognitive function. Methods Exposures considered were maternal BMI, height and weight, micronutrient status (vitamins D, B12, folate and iron) and macronutrient intakes (carbohydrate, protein and fat). The outcome was any measure of cognitive function in children aged <18 years. We considered observational studies and trials with allocation groups that differed by single nutrients. We searched Medline/PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases and reference lists of retrieved literature. Two reviewers independently extracted data from relevant articles. We used methods recommended by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Results Of 16,143 articles identified, 38 met inclusion criteria. Most studies were observational, and from high-income settings. There were few randomized controlled trials. There was consistent evidence linking maternal obesity with lower cognitive function in children; low maternal BMI has been inadequately studied. Among three studies of maternal vitamin D status, two showed lower cognitive function in children of deficient mothers. One trial of folic acid supplementation showed no effects on the children’s cognitive function and evidence from 13 observational studies was mixed. Among seven studies of maternal vitamin B12 status, most showed no association, though two studies in highly deficient populations suggested a possible effect. Four out of six observational studies and two trials (including one in an Iron deficient population) found no association of maternal iron status with offspring cognitive function. One trial of maternal carbohydrate/protein supplementation showed no effects on offspring cognitive function. Conclusions Current evidence that maternal nutritional status during pregnancy as defined by BMI, single micronutrient studies, or macronutrient intakes influences offspring cognitive function is inconclusive. There is a need for more trials especially in populations with high rates of maternal undernutrition. Systematic review registration Registered in PROSPERO CRD42013005702.

Text
Veena et al Maternal nutrition BMC Preg Childbirth 2016 Final accepted version.doc - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (340kB)
Text
s12884-016-1011-z - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (990kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 August 2016
Published date: 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 397509
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397509
ISSN: 1471-2393
PURE UUID: 0e865ce6-ff42-4a75-a528-d7521f010ea1
ORCID for Catharine R. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638
ORCID for Sarah H. Kehoe: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2584-7999
ORCID for Caroline H.D. Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jul 2016 10:49
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:54

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Sargoor R. Veena
Author: Ghattu V. Krishnaveni
Author: Sarah H. Kehoe ORCID iD
Author: Krishnamachari Srinivasan

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×