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The migration processes of students into higher educational institutions in the United Kingdom

The migration processes of students into higher educational institutions in the United Kingdom
The migration processes of students into higher educational institutions in the United Kingdom
The higher educational system in the UK plays a crucial role in the economic development of the country and significantly impacts on the future labour market outcomes for individuals. With participation rates in higher education continually increasing and the recent changes to student financing burdening the student with more of the costs of higher education, the decision of where and what to study has become increasingly important.

Despite this, there has been little work conducted to date that analyses in detail the migratory patterns of the large student population in the United Kingdom and their movements into Higher Education (HE). The overall aim of this thesis is to advance the current understanding of the student migration processes in the United Kingdom by considering three broad areas of enquiry and analysis; patterns and measurement of student migration, characteristics and correlations of student migration and lastly, future outcomes of student migration. This research uses data from the Higher Educational Statistics Agency (HESA) to provide a cross-sectional snapshot of the student migration situation in the UK.

The thesis puts forward a unique typology that is used to categorise and measure the different migration decisions that a person can undertake in order to attend a Higher Educational Institution (HEI). Using this typology, the results demonstrate that, the previously assumed traditional transition in to higher education of migrating away from the parental home to study at a HEI is no longer the majority transition experienced by HE students in the UK. Secondly, a new spatial classification of student migration is created and the results show a clear difference in the migration outcomes of students from the South of the UK compared to the North, with the latter being less likely to migrate. Statistical modelling of the student migration process in the UK showed that migration into a HEI in the UK is not equal across ethnicity, socio-economic background and gender. Finally, the results regarding the impact of migrating in order to attend a HEI on the labour market outcomes after graduating were marginal. No clear causal impacts of the migration decision on the future labour market outcomes were identified.
Bailey, Neil
ddb52b25-8291-463a-b13a-7fce82627f47
Bailey, Neil
ddb52b25-8291-463a-b13a-7fce82627f47
Bijak, Jakub
e33bf9d3-fca6-405f-844c-4b2decf93c66
Schnepf, Sylke
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Raymer, James
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Bailey, Neil (2015) The migration processes of students into higher educational institutions in the United Kingdom. University of Southampton, Faculty of Human and Social Sciences, Doctoral Thesis, 343pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The higher educational system in the UK plays a crucial role in the economic development of the country and significantly impacts on the future labour market outcomes for individuals. With participation rates in higher education continually increasing and the recent changes to student financing burdening the student with more of the costs of higher education, the decision of where and what to study has become increasingly important.

Despite this, there has been little work conducted to date that analyses in detail the migratory patterns of the large student population in the United Kingdom and their movements into Higher Education (HE). The overall aim of this thesis is to advance the current understanding of the student migration processes in the United Kingdom by considering three broad areas of enquiry and analysis; patterns and measurement of student migration, characteristics and correlations of student migration and lastly, future outcomes of student migration. This research uses data from the Higher Educational Statistics Agency (HESA) to provide a cross-sectional snapshot of the student migration situation in the UK.

The thesis puts forward a unique typology that is used to categorise and measure the different migration decisions that a person can undertake in order to attend a Higher Educational Institution (HEI). Using this typology, the results demonstrate that, the previously assumed traditional transition in to higher education of migrating away from the parental home to study at a HEI is no longer the majority transition experienced by HE students in the UK. Secondly, a new spatial classification of student migration is created and the results show a clear difference in the migration outcomes of students from the South of the UK compared to the North, with the latter being less likely to migrate. Statistical modelling of the student migration process in the UK showed that migration into a HEI in the UK is not equal across ethnicity, socio-economic background and gender. Finally, the results regarding the impact of migrating in order to attend a HEI on the labour market outcomes after graduating were marginal. No clear causal impacts of the migration decision on the future labour market outcomes were identified.

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More information

Published date: October 2015
Organisations: University of Southampton, Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 397588
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397588
PURE UUID: 09f5b556-f270-4881-8a62-bab3a212250a
ORCID for Jakub Bijak: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2563-5040

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jul 2016 14:24
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:35

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