The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Lipid structure does not modify incorporation 1 of EPA and DHA into blood lipids in healthy adults: a randomised control trial

Lipid structure does not modify incorporation 1 of EPA and DHA into blood lipids in healthy adults: a randomised control trial
Lipid structure does not modify incorporation 1 of EPA and DHA into blood lipids in healthy adults: a randomised control trial
Dietary supplementation is an effective means to improve eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status. However, it is unclear whether lipid structure affects EPA+DHA bioavailability. We determined the effect of consuming different EPA and DHA lipid structures on their concentrations in blood during the postprandial period and during dietary supplementation compared to unmodified fish oil triglyceride (uTAG). In a postprandial crossover study, healthy men (n 9) consumed in random order test meals containing 1.1 g EPA + 0.37 g DHA as either uTAG, re-esterified TAG, free fatty acids (FFAs) or ethyl esters (EEs). In a parallel design supplementation study, healthy men and women (n 10/ sex/ supplement) consumed one supplement type for 12 weeks. Fatty acid composition was determined by gas chromatography. EPA incorporation over 6 hours into TAG or phosphatidylcholine (PC) did not differ between lipid structures. EPA enrichment in non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) was lower from EEs than from uTAG (P = 0.01). Plasma TAG, PC or NEFA DHA incorporation did not differ between lipid structures. Lipid structure did not affect TAG or NEFA EPA incorporation, and PC or NEFA DHA incorporation following dietary supplementation. Plasma TAG peak DHA incorporation was greater (P = 0.02) and time to peak shorter (P = 0.02) from FFAs than from uTAG in men. In both studies, the order of EPA and DHA incorporation was PC > TAG > NEFA. In conclusion, EPA and DHA lipid structure may not be an important consideration in dietary interventions
0007-1145
788-797
West, Annette
e8dacc1a-5fdc-4a4f-92d8-608f2ea2994c
Burdge, Graham
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
West, Annette
e8dacc1a-5fdc-4a4f-92d8-608f2ea2994c
Burdge, Graham
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

West, Annette, Burdge, Graham and Calder, Philip (2016) Lipid structure does not modify incorporation 1 of EPA and DHA into blood lipids in healthy adults: a randomised control trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 116 (5), 788-797. (doi:10.1017/S0007114516002713). (PMID:27424661)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dietary supplementation is an effective means to improve eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status. However, it is unclear whether lipid structure affects EPA+DHA bioavailability. We determined the effect of consuming different EPA and DHA lipid structures on their concentrations in blood during the postprandial period and during dietary supplementation compared to unmodified fish oil triglyceride (uTAG). In a postprandial crossover study, healthy men (n 9) consumed in random order test meals containing 1.1 g EPA + 0.37 g DHA as either uTAG, re-esterified TAG, free fatty acids (FFAs) or ethyl esters (EEs). In a parallel design supplementation study, healthy men and women (n 10/ sex/ supplement) consumed one supplement type for 12 weeks. Fatty acid composition was determined by gas chromatography. EPA incorporation over 6 hours into TAG or phosphatidylcholine (PC) did not differ between lipid structures. EPA enrichment in non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) was lower from EEs than from uTAG (P = 0.01). Plasma TAG, PC or NEFA DHA incorporation did not differ between lipid structures. Lipid structure did not affect TAG or NEFA EPA incorporation, and PC or NEFA DHA incorporation following dietary supplementation. Plasma TAG peak DHA incorporation was greater (P = 0.02) and time to peak shorter (P = 0.02) from FFAs than from uTAG in men. In both studies, the order of EPA and DHA incorporation was PC > TAG > NEFA. In conclusion, EPA and DHA lipid structure may not be an important consideration in dietary interventions

Text
West Burdge Calder BJN Accepted version June 2016.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 June 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 July 2016
Published date: September 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 397633
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397633
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 3d4e4a93-5344-4036-b15f-708e3febf0bb
ORCID for Graham Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Jul 2016 07:42
Last modified: 11 Mar 2021 02:35

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Annette West
Author: Graham Burdge ORCID iD
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×