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Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis

Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis
Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis (OA) has been thought of as a disease of cartilage that can be effectively treated surgically at severe stages with joint arthroplasty. Today, OA is considered a whole-organ disease that is amenable to prevention and treatment at early stages. OA develops slowly over 10–15 years, interfering with activities of daily living and the ability to work. Many patients tolerate pain, and many health-care providers accept pain and disability as inevitable corollaries of OA and ageing. Too often, health-care providers passively await final 'joint death', necessitating knee and hip replacements. Instead, OA should be viewed as a chronic condition, where prevention and early comprehensive-care models are the accepted norm, as is the case with other chronic diseases. Joint injury, obesity and impaired muscle function are modifiable risk factors amenable to primary and secondary prevention strategies. The strategies that are most appropriate for each patient should be identified, by selecting interventions to correct—or at least attenuate—OA risk factors. We must also choose the interventions that are most likely to be acceptable to patients, to maximize adherence to—and persistence with—the regimes. Now is the time to begin the era of personalized prevention for knee OA.
1759-4790
92-101
Roos, Ewa M.
b4e1df9a-f940-4a3d-aabd-81734a3c308c
Arden, Nigel K.
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f
Roos, Ewa M.
b4e1df9a-f940-4a3d-aabd-81734a3c308c
Arden, Nigel K.
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f

Roos, Ewa M. and Arden, Nigel K. (2016) Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis. Nature Rheumatology Reviews, 12 (2), 92-101. (doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.135). (PMID:26439406)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) has been thought of as a disease of cartilage that can be effectively treated surgically at severe stages with joint arthroplasty. Today, OA is considered a whole-organ disease that is amenable to prevention and treatment at early stages. OA develops slowly over 10–15 years, interfering with activities of daily living and the ability to work. Many patients tolerate pain, and many health-care providers accept pain and disability as inevitable corollaries of OA and ageing. Too often, health-care providers passively await final 'joint death', necessitating knee and hip replacements. Instead, OA should be viewed as a chronic condition, where prevention and early comprehensive-care models are the accepted norm, as is the case with other chronic diseases. Joint injury, obesity and impaired muscle function are modifiable risk factors amenable to primary and secondary prevention strategies. The strategies that are most appropriate for each patient should be identified, by selecting interventions to correct—or at least attenuate—OA risk factors. We must also choose the interventions that are most likely to be acceptable to patients, to maximize adherence to—and persistence with—the regimes. Now is the time to begin the era of personalized prevention for knee OA.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 October 2015
Published date: February 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 397724
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397724
ISSN: 1759-4790
PURE UUID: aa843388-c59c-4c0f-998a-b7289b29f8d8

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Date deposited: 05 Jul 2016 09:55
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 20:18

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Contributors

Author: Ewa M. Roos
Author: Nigel K. Arden

University divisions

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