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High voltage positive electrodes for high energy lithium-ion batteries

High voltage positive electrodes for high energy lithium-ion batteries
High voltage positive electrodes for high energy lithium-ion batteries
Lithium-ion high voltage cathode materials are discussed within this thesis, with LiCoPO4 as a composite electrode evaluated for use as the active compound within lithium half-cells. A comprehensive literature review on lithium containing cathode materials with a focus on high voltage materials is provided. The majority of the materials within this work were synthesised using solvothermal techniques, which were characterised through XRD and SEM. Composite type electrodes were prepared through mainly using PTFE as the binder material, and different electrolytes were also investigated.

Composite electrodes were electrochemically evulated with competitive capacites obtained compared to the literature. The performance of the LiCoPO4 composite electrodes was found to be significantly different and attributed to the use of different synthesis solvents and heating conditions used for synthesis. The rate performance and electrochemical cycling was found to depend highly on the surface area and particle size of the composite electrode. XANES and in-situ XRD was performed at Diamond Light Source (UK synchrotron), where the LiCoPO4 charge profile was fully characterised. It was found that LiCoPO4 undergoes transient lattice parameter changes during charging, and that phase recovery during any relaxations was observed.
Palmer, Michael
635fbccf-5ad8-4aed-b495-93b84b6217fd
Palmer, Michael
635fbccf-5ad8-4aed-b495-93b84b6217fd
Hector, Andrew
f19a8f31-b37f-4474-b32a-b7cf05b9f0e5

(2016) High voltage positive electrodes for high energy lithium-ion batteries. University of Southampton, Faculty of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Doctoral Thesis, 202pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Lithium-ion high voltage cathode materials are discussed within this thesis, with LiCoPO4 as a composite electrode evaluated for use as the active compound within lithium half-cells. A comprehensive literature review on lithium containing cathode materials with a focus on high voltage materials is provided. The majority of the materials within this work were synthesised using solvothermal techniques, which were characterised through XRD and SEM. Composite type electrodes were prepared through mainly using PTFE as the binder material, and different electrolytes were also investigated.

Composite electrodes were electrochemically evulated with competitive capacites obtained compared to the literature. The performance of the LiCoPO4 composite electrodes was found to be significantly different and attributed to the use of different synthesis solvents and heating conditions used for synthesis. The rate performance and electrochemical cycling was found to depend highly on the surface area and particle size of the composite electrode. XANES and in-situ XRD was performed at Diamond Light Source (UK synchrotron), where the LiCoPO4 charge profile was fully characterised. It was found that LiCoPO4 undergoes transient lattice parameter changes during charging, and that phase recovery during any relaxations was observed.

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Published date: 31 May 2016
Organisations: University of Southampton, Chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398001
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398001
PURE UUID: d95d4202-bff0-454b-ab2b-23172c4df5b9
ORCID for Andrew Hector: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9964-2163

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Date deposited: 15 Jul 2016 12:54
Last modified: 30 Jun 2019 04:01

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