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Sonar equations for planetary exploration

Sonar equations for planetary exploration
Sonar equations for planetary exploration
The set of formulations commonly known as 'the sonar equations' have for many decades been used to quantify the performance of sonar systems in terms of their ability to detect and localize objects submerged in seawater. The efficacy of the sonar equations, with individual terms evaluated in decibels, is well established in Earth's oceans. The sonar equations have been used in the past for missions to other planets and moons in our solar system, for which they are shown to be less suitable. Whilst it would be preferable to undertake high-fidelity acoustical calculations to support planning, execution and interpretation of acoustic data from planetary probes, to avoid possible errors for planned missions to such extraterrestrial bodies in future, doing so requires awareness of the pitfalls pointed out in this paper. There is a need to reexamine the assumptions, practices and calibrations that work well for Earth, to ensure that the sonar equations can be accurately applied in combination with the decibel to extraterrestrial scenarios. Examples are given for icy oceans such as exist on Europa and Ganymede, Titan's hydrocarbon lakes, and for the gaseous atmospheres of (e.g.) Jupiter and Venus
0001-4966
1400-1419
Anslie, Michael
5469e0b3-e0e2-4874-8355-958c522f5a1e
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Anslie, Michael
5469e0b3-e0e2-4874-8355-958c522f5a1e
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae

Anslie, Michael and Leighton, Timothy (2016) Sonar equations for planetary exploration. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 140 (2), 1400-1419. (doi:10.1121/1.4960786).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The set of formulations commonly known as 'the sonar equations' have for many decades been used to quantify the performance of sonar systems in terms of their ability to detect and localize objects submerged in seawater. The efficacy of the sonar equations, with individual terms evaluated in decibels, is well established in Earth's oceans. The sonar equations have been used in the past for missions to other planets and moons in our solar system, for which they are shown to be less suitable. Whilst it would be preferable to undertake high-fidelity acoustical calculations to support planning, execution and interpretation of acoustic data from planetary probes, to avoid possible errors for planned missions to such extraterrestrial bodies in future, doing so requires awareness of the pitfalls pointed out in this paper. There is a need to reexamine the assumptions, practices and calibrations that work well for Earth, to ensure that the sonar equations can be accurately applied in combination with the decibel to extraterrestrial scenarios. Examples are given for icy oceans such as exist on Europa and Ganymede, Titan's hydrocarbon lakes, and for the gaseous atmospheres of (e.g.) Jupiter and Venus

Text
__soton.ac.uk_UDE_PersonalFiles_Users_cc1n12_mydocuments_PROF LEIGHTON_Article pdfs_Ainslie M A and Leighton T G (2016) Sonar equations for planetary exploration - JASA-00385_R1 (submitted post review).pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 14 July 2016
Published date: 31 August 2016
Organisations: Inst. Sound & Vibration Research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398067
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398067
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 54dbe3ee-ad03-4a1a-a942-c736f0a48cea
ORCID for Timothy Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750

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Date deposited: 18 Jul 2016 08:26
Last modified: 17 Jul 2018 04:01

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