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Anaerobic digestion of spring and winter wheat: comparison of net energy yields

Anaerobic digestion of spring and winter wheat: comparison of net energy yields
Anaerobic digestion of spring and winter wheat: comparison of net energy yields
Anaerobic digestion of wheat was investigated under batch conditions. The article compares the potential net energy yield between a winter wheat (sown in the autumn) and a spring wheat (sown in the spring) grown in the same year and harvested at the same growth stage in the same farm. The spring wheat had a slightly higher biochemical methane potential and required lower energy inputs in cultivation, but produced a lower dry biomass yield per hectare, which resulted in winter wheat providing the best overall net energy yield. The difference was small; both varieties gave a good net energy yield. Spring sowing may also offer the opportunity for growing an additional over-winter catch crop for spring harvest, thus increasing the overall biomass yield per hectare, with both crops being potential digester feedstocks.
1093-4529
1-6
Rincon, Barbara
d2c44d44-66e6-4310-80b3-c71da463f147
Heaven, Sonia
f25f74b6-97bd-4a18-b33b-a63084718571
Salter, Andrew M.
e0537412-9a1c-4f00-9b08-d8dce9dbc900
Banks, Charles J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f
Rincon, Barbara
d2c44d44-66e6-4310-80b3-c71da463f147
Heaven, Sonia
f25f74b6-97bd-4a18-b33b-a63084718571
Salter, Andrew M.
e0537412-9a1c-4f00-9b08-d8dce9dbc900
Banks, Charles J.
5c6c8c4b-5b25-4e37-9058-50fa8d2e926f

Rincon, Barbara, Heaven, Sonia, Salter, Andrew M. and Banks, Charles J. (2016) Anaerobic digestion of spring and winter wheat: comparison of net energy yields. Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, 1-6. (doi:10.1080/10934529.2016.1198634).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Anaerobic digestion of wheat was investigated under batch conditions. The article compares the potential net energy yield between a winter wheat (sown in the autumn) and a spring wheat (sown in the spring) grown in the same year and harvested at the same growth stage in the same farm. The spring wheat had a slightly higher biochemical methane potential and required lower energy inputs in cultivation, but produced a lower dry biomass yield per hectare, which resulted in winter wheat providing the best overall net energy yield. The difference was small; both varieties gave a good net energy yield. Spring sowing may also offer the opportunity for growing an additional over-winter catch crop for spring harvest, thus increasing the overall biomass yield per hectare, with both crops being potential digester feedstocks.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 July 2016
Organisations: Water & Environmental Engineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398139
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398139
ISSN: 1093-4529
PURE UUID: 846eace9-4349-4778-bc21-34200b8dcebe

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Date deposited: 20 Jul 2016 10:14
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 06:28

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