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Solid and liquid modernity: a comparison of the social geography of places to die in the UK and Australia: a comparison of the socialgeography of places to die in the UK and Australia

Solid and liquid modernity: a comparison of the social geography of places to die in the UK and Australia: a comparison of the socialgeography of places to die in the UK and Australia
Solid and liquid modernity: a comparison of the social geography of places to die in the UK and Australia: a comparison of the socialgeography of places to die in the UK and Australia
Preferred place of care and death is a widely used quality measure for palliative and end of life care services. In this paper we explore the use of Zygmunt Bauman’s ideas on solid and liquid modernity to understand the complexity of the social geographical contexts of delivering and receiving care. While solid ways of dying offer certainty and standardised care, more liquid ways allow for individualised care connected to family and communities.Understanding the complex tensions between solid and liquid aspects of palliative care may allow practitioners to help dying people to die in the ways and places they prefer.
0748-1187
103-111
Randall, Duncan
21b02c15-4d2c-4491-b4ae-e8008c1a093e
Rosenberg, John
47f93f9d-7adf-4f23-b014-a532bc285150
Reimer, Suzanne
d6594766-1967-4439-a8bb-14e52a6e2f5f
Randall, Duncan
21b02c15-4d2c-4491-b4ae-e8008c1a093e
Rosenberg, John
47f93f9d-7adf-4f23-b014-a532bc285150
Reimer, Suzanne
d6594766-1967-4439-a8bb-14e52a6e2f5f

Randall, Duncan, Rosenberg, John and Reimer, Suzanne (2017) Solid and liquid modernity: a comparison of the social geography of places to die in the UK and Australia: a comparison of the socialgeography of places to die in the UK and Australia. Death Studies, 41 (2), 103-111. (doi:10.1080/07481187.2016.1225858).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Preferred place of care and death is a widely used quality measure for palliative and end of life care services. In this paper we explore the use of Zygmunt Bauman’s ideas on solid and liquid modernity to understand the complexity of the social geographical contexts of delivering and receiving care. While solid ways of dying offer certainty and standardised care, more liquid ways allow for individualised care connected to family and communities.Understanding the complex tensions between solid and liquid aspects of palliative care may allow practitioners to help dying people to die in the ways and places they prefer.

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Solid and liquid modernity A comparison of the social geography of places to die in the UK and Australia. - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 20 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 September 2016
Published date: 2017
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398177
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398177
ISSN: 0748-1187
PURE UUID: f805a98f-fe6e-4421-8f6b-4877023486f4
ORCID for Duncan Randall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8356-7373
ORCID for Suzanne Reimer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7325-4368

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Date deposited: 21 Jul 2016 10:20
Last modified: 08 Oct 2020 04:04

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