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Susceptibility loci for pigmentation and melanoma in relation to Parkinson's disease

Susceptibility loci for pigmentation and melanoma in relation to Parkinson's disease
Susceptibility loci for pigmentation and melanoma in relation to Parkinson's disease
Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have a lower risk for most types of cancer except for melanoma, which has a modest positive association with PD. Pigmentation genes have been hypothesized to contribute to this association. We therefore examined whether genetic susceptibility loci for pigmentation or melanoma was associated with PD risk in 2 large independent datasets. In the Parkinson's Genes and Environment (PAGE) study, we examined 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of pigmentation or melanoma in relation to PD among 808 PD cases and 1623 controls; furthermore, we also examined the colors of hair, eye, or skin and melanoma in relation to PD. In the International Parkinson's Disease Genomic Consortium (IPDGC), we examined a broader selection of 360 pigmentation or melanoma GWAS SNPs in relation to PD among 5,333 PD cases and 12,019 controls. All participants were non-Hispanic Whites. As expected, in the PAGE study, most SNPs were associated with 1 or more pigmentation phenotypes. However, neither these SNPs nor pigmentation phenotypes were associated with PD risk after Bonferroni correction with the exception of rs4911414 at the ASIP gene (p = .001). A total of 18 PD cases (2.2%) and 26 controls (1.6%) had a diagnosis of melanoma with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-2.4). In the IPDGC analysis, none of the 360 SNPs, including rs4911414, were associated with PD risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, we did not find significant associations between GWAS SNPs of pigmentation or melanoma and the risk for PD.
1512.e5-1512.e10
Dong, Jing
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Gao, Jianjun
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Nalls, Michael
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Gao, Xiang
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Huang, Xuemei
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Han, Jiali
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Singleton, Andrew B.
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Chen, Honglei
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Morrison, Karen
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Dong, Jing
da483db5-e971-4aac-bbd9-f2a6283eeae3
Gao, Jianjun
5c166d7f-ae20-45ce-8304-1b7a64d1236e
Nalls, Michael
a9fd7915-148d-42c1-a7a6-cca3bd5d260a
Gao, Xiang
de0859d5-476c-4420-8000-362ac89b59c3
Huang, Xuemei
9dbbdf3f-135b-406b-ad8f-3e39e821abe1
Han, Jiali
3d459a33-e84d-4ee3-9000-49339dd5647c
Singleton, Andrew B.
66288e5c-8235-4eed-8989-2ff805343570
Chen, Honglei
1796d79a-8fe9-4fea-867e-6348a3365799
Morrison, Karen
f00890f0-2fde-4dbd-a73b-7422e1b0ede8

Dong, Jing, Gao, Jianjun and Nalls, Michael et al. (2013) Susceptibility loci for pigmentation and melanoma in relation to Parkinson's disease. Neurobiology of Aging, 35 (6), 1512.e5-1512.e10. (doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2013.12.020). (PMID:24439955) (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have a lower risk for most types of cancer except for melanoma, which has a modest positive association with PD. Pigmentation genes have been hypothesized to contribute to this association. We therefore examined whether genetic susceptibility loci for pigmentation or melanoma was associated with PD risk in 2 large independent datasets. In the Parkinson's Genes and Environment (PAGE) study, we examined 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of pigmentation or melanoma in relation to PD among 808 PD cases and 1623 controls; furthermore, we also examined the colors of hair, eye, or skin and melanoma in relation to PD. In the International Parkinson's Disease Genomic Consortium (IPDGC), we examined a broader selection of 360 pigmentation or melanoma GWAS SNPs in relation to PD among 5,333 PD cases and 12,019 controls. All participants were non-Hispanic Whites. As expected, in the PAGE study, most SNPs were associated with 1 or more pigmentation phenotypes. However, neither these SNPs nor pigmentation phenotypes were associated with PD risk after Bonferroni correction with the exception of rs4911414 at the ASIP gene (p = .001). A total of 18 PD cases (2.2%) and 26 controls (1.6%) had a diagnosis of melanoma with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-2.4). In the IPDGC analysis, none of the 360 SNPs, including rs4911414, were associated with PD risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, we did not find significant associations between GWAS SNPs of pigmentation or melanoma and the risk for PD.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 December 2013
Organisations: Medical Education

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398214
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398214
PURE UUID: c3255eb6-d527-41b1-94ae-4202f2733b12
ORCID for Karen Morrison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0216-5717

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Date deposited: 20 Jul 2016 15:18
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 01:33

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Contributors

Author: Jing Dong
Author: Jianjun Gao
Author: Michael Nalls
Author: Xiang Gao
Author: Xuemei Huang
Author: Jiali Han
Author: Andrew B. Singleton
Author: Honglei Chen
Author: Karen Morrison ORCID iD

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