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Antenatal drug consumption: the burden of self-medication in a developing world setting

Antenatal drug consumption: the burden of self-medication in a developing world setting
Antenatal drug consumption: the burden of self-medication in a developing world setting
This institutional-based cross-sectional study examines the burden of self-medication during pregnancy in a middle-income country setting and the impact on fetal wellbeing. Using a blend of open-ended and indication-oriented questionnaires, 346 pregnant women at term were interviewed about their pregnancy complaints and drug intake. Inferential statistical data analysis was employed with level of significance (?) set at 0.05. Excluding routine supplements and vaccinations, 251 (72.5%) women used medicines, of whom 79 (31.5%) had self-medicated. Consuming drugs without prescription was associated with increased US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) risk category (?(2)?=?8.375; P?=?0.015). There is therefore a need to scale up efforts towards educating women about the dangers of self-medication, while also introducing effective restrictive policies on over-the-counter drug sales
0049-4755
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429
Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu
7c475e5b-223b-4d26-9b60-85b32af15727
Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa
57adb1ff-5884-4c29-a869-5d1300029429

Adanikin, Abiodun, Idowu and Awoleke, Jacob Olumuyiwa (2016) Antenatal drug consumption: the burden of self-medication in a developing world setting. Tropical Doctor. (doi:10.1177/0049475516653067). (PMID:27302199)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This institutional-based cross-sectional study examines the burden of self-medication during pregnancy in a middle-income country setting and the impact on fetal wellbeing. Using a blend of open-ended and indication-oriented questionnaires, 346 pregnant women at term were interviewed about their pregnancy complaints and drug intake. Inferential statistical data analysis was employed with level of significance (?) set at 0.05. Excluding routine supplements and vaccinations, 251 (72.5%) women used medicines, of whom 79 (31.5%) had self-medicated. Consuming drugs without prescription was associated with increased US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) risk category (?(2)?=?8.375; P?=?0.015). There is therefore a need to scale up efforts towards educating women about the dangers of self-medication, while also introducing effective restrictive policies on over-the-counter drug sales

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 June 2016
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398359
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398359
ISSN: 0049-4755
PURE UUID: 19b7c090-7b8b-4e6b-95e5-bc2d5818b193

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Date deposited: 22 Jul 2016 10:23
Last modified: 09 Jan 2018 17:58

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