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Personalizing reminders to personality for melanoma self-checking

Personalizing reminders to personality for melanoma self-checking
Personalizing reminders to personality for melanoma self-checking
This paper investigates whether different types of persuasive reminder should be sent to patients with different personalities. We describe a study where we presented participants with a personality measure, then describe a scenario with a fictional patient, who has not performed a skin check for recurrent melanoma. We asked patients to imagine they are in that situation and rate validated reminders based on Cialdini's 6 principles of persuasion for their suitability. Participants then chose their favourite reminder, and an alternative reminder to send if that one failed. We found that persuasive reminders that use `Authority' and 'Liking' are the most popular overall. We also found that personality had an effect when deciding on the type of persuasive reminder to use. In particular, we have found that those with high emotional stability are more responsive to any kind of persuasion, those with low agreeableness rated all types of reminder higher than those with high, and that conscientiousness matters when selecting an alternative reminder.
85-93
Smith, Kirsten A.
9da65772-0efa-4267-87ff-563f9757b34e
Dennis, Matt.
3dcb2cf3-5964-4091-bd35-16a0101c8b93
Masthoff, Judith.
2d983480-dcf5-477e-9c54-b9a41edaede8
Smith, Kirsten A.
9da65772-0efa-4267-87ff-563f9757b34e
Dennis, Matt.
3dcb2cf3-5964-4091-bd35-16a0101c8b93
Masthoff, Judith.
2d983480-dcf5-477e-9c54-b9a41edaede8

Smith, Kirsten A., Dennis, Matt. and Masthoff, Judith. (2016) Personalizing reminders to personality for melanoma self-checking. UMAP 2016: 24th Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization, Canada. 13 - 16 Jul 2016. pp. 85-93 . (doi:10.1145/2930238.2930254).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

This paper investigates whether different types of persuasive reminder should be sent to patients with different personalities. We describe a study where we presented participants with a personality measure, then describe a scenario with a fictional patient, who has not performed a skin check for recurrent melanoma. We asked patients to imagine they are in that situation and rate validated reminders based on Cialdini's 6 principles of persuasion for their suitability. Participants then chose their favourite reminder, and an alternative reminder to send if that one failed. We found that persuasive reminders that use `Authority' and 'Liking' are the most popular overall. We also found that personality had an effect when deciding on the type of persuasive reminder to use. In particular, we have found that those with high emotional stability are more responsive to any kind of persuasion, those with low agreeableness rated all types of reminder higher than those with high, and that conscientiousness matters when selecting an alternative reminder.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 13 July 2016
Venue - Dates: UMAP 2016: 24th Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization, Canada, 2016-07-13 - 2016-07-16
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398813
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398813
PURE UUID: e6631721-cbf2-4ef7-90f7-8f0e41f642e3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Aug 2016 10:23
Last modified: 09 May 2018 16:31

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