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Isolation of separate Ureaplasma species from endotracheal secretions of twin patients

Isolation of separate Ureaplasma species from endotracheal secretions of twin patients
Isolation of separate Ureaplasma species from endotracheal secretions of twin patients
Isolation of Ureaplasma spp. from preterm neonates and the association with development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia has been previously investigated. However, few studies have contrasted the nature of infection in twins. In this article, we report that dizygotic twins (1 girl, 1 boy) born at 24 weeks gestation both yielded culturable Ureaplasma from endotracheal secretions. The samples were part of a serial blind collection cohort of ventilated premature neonates, and analysis of repeat cultures showed stable, separate infections over a period of 17 and 21 days, respectively. Immunoblot and probe-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis determined that Twin 1 was solely infected with Ureaplasma parvum (specifically, serovar 6 by gene sequencing), whereas Twin 2 was solely infected with Ureaplasma urealyticum (specifically, genotype A- serovars 2, 5, and 8 by gene sequencing). Immunoblot analysis found that the major surface antigen (multiple-banded antigen) altered relative mass for both strains during the course of infection. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of extracted endotracheal aspirates confirmed no evidence of mixed infection for either twin. Failure of sentinel ventilated preterm infants on the same ward to acquire Ureaplasma infection after the first week of birth suggests no cot-to-cot transfer of Ureaplasma infection occurred. This study demonstrated not only a contrasting clinical outcome for a set of twins infected with 2 separate species of Ureaplasma, but also the first real-time demonstration of multiple-banded antigen alteration and evolution of Ureaplasma over the course of a clinical infection.
0031-4005
1-7
Beeton, Michael
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Maxwell, Nicola
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Chalker, Victoria
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Brown, Rebecca
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Aboklaish, Ali
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Spiller, O. Brad
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Beeton, Michael
df385077-f7e1-4200-9318-7653347c879b
Maxwell, Nicola
d22ef948-54e2-4449-86b2-5832995f577a
Chalker, Victoria
7e7a099b-3b9a-4f62-b8d3-b8e469cb1541
Brown, Rebecca
a4912e7b-0056-4d4d-843d-3baf69f97f58
Aboklaish, Ali
3fb1059d-7995-48bc-95b0-2f229206260b
Spiller, O. Brad
a802a26a-804c-4839-a25e-830e3856e852

Beeton, Michael, Maxwell, Nicola, Chalker, Victoria, Brown, Rebecca, Aboklaish, Ali and Spiller, O. Brad (2016) Isolation of separate Ureaplasma species from endotracheal secretions of twin patients. Pediatrics, 138 (2), 1-7. (doi:10.1542/peds.2016-0565). (PMID:27418415)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Isolation of Ureaplasma spp. from preterm neonates and the association with development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia has been previously investigated. However, few studies have contrasted the nature of infection in twins. In this article, we report that dizygotic twins (1 girl, 1 boy) born at 24 weeks gestation both yielded culturable Ureaplasma from endotracheal secretions. The samples were part of a serial blind collection cohort of ventilated premature neonates, and analysis of repeat cultures showed stable, separate infections over a period of 17 and 21 days, respectively. Immunoblot and probe-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis determined that Twin 1 was solely infected with Ureaplasma parvum (specifically, serovar 6 by gene sequencing), whereas Twin 2 was solely infected with Ureaplasma urealyticum (specifically, genotype A- serovars 2, 5, and 8 by gene sequencing). Immunoblot analysis found that the major surface antigen (multiple-banded antigen) altered relative mass for both strains during the course of infection. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of extracted endotracheal aspirates confirmed no evidence of mixed infection for either twin. Failure of sentinel ventilated preterm infants on the same ward to acquire Ureaplasma infection after the first week of birth suggests no cot-to-cot transfer of Ureaplasma infection occurred. This study demonstrated not only a contrasting clinical outcome for a set of twins infected with 2 separate species of Ureaplasma, but also the first real-time demonstration of multiple-banded antigen alteration and evolution of Ureaplasma over the course of a clinical infection.

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Accepted/In Press date: 6 May 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 August 2016
Published date: August 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399082
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399082
ISSN: 0031-4005
PURE UUID: 8b0d7f28-7ccb-4f51-8e10-376a7dc89382
ORCID for Rebecca Brown: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5825-6859

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Date deposited: 05 Aug 2016 08:46
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 06:27

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Contributors

Author: Michael Beeton
Author: Nicola Maxwell
Author: Victoria Chalker
Author: Rebecca Brown ORCID iD
Author: Ali Aboklaish
Author: O. Brad Spiller

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