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Dietary variety and food group consumption in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet

Dietary variety and food group consumption in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet
Dietary variety and food group consumption in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet
Dietary variety is defined as the number of different foods or food groups consumed over a given reference period, the consensus being that dietary variety and dietary quality are positively correlated. Recently there has been considerable interest in the association between infant dietary variety and atopic disease.

Methods

This was a cross-sectional study of 8- to 27-month-old children from the Isle of Wight, UK, including two groups: a group of children consuming a cows' milk exclusion (CME) diet and a control group of children consuming an unrestricted diet. Parents completed a validated food frequency questionnaire, from which dietary variety and consumption of food groups were calculated. Growth measurements were recorded.

Results

A total of 126 participants of mean age 13.0 months were recruited. In addition to the expected differences in dairy and soya consumption, the CME group consumed sweet foods 1.6 times less frequently, non-water drinks seven times less frequently (p < 0.05) and ready-made baby foods 15 times more frequently (p < 0.01) than the control group. Overall dietary variety was significantly lower in the CME group (p < 0.01) as was variety of meat and sweet foods consumed. There was a greater concern with healthy eating in the CME group (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Children consuming an exclusion diet for cows' milk allergy have an overall less varied diet, including a less varied consumption of meat and sweet foods. Efforts should be made to ensure exclusion diets are as varied as possible to optimize nutritional intake.
0905-6157
471-477
Maslin, Kate
c5a832fd-2b82-4741-ab6c-4da45ffc91b8
Dean, Tara
b8719b02-a375-457f-aa33-74f9352613e6
Arshad, Syed Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Venter, Carina
a9b7dd5e-b0cb-4068-be82-e15b587cc20b
Maslin, Kate
c5a832fd-2b82-4741-ab6c-4da45ffc91b8
Dean, Tara
b8719b02-a375-457f-aa33-74f9352613e6
Arshad, Syed Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Venter, Carina
a9b7dd5e-b0cb-4068-be82-e15b587cc20b

Maslin, Kate, Dean, Tara, Arshad, Syed Hasan and Venter, Carina (2016) Dietary variety and food group consumption in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 27 (5), 471-477. (doi:10.1111/pai.12573). (PMID:27062104)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dietary variety is defined as the number of different foods or food groups consumed over a given reference period, the consensus being that dietary variety and dietary quality are positively correlated. Recently there has been considerable interest in the association between infant dietary variety and atopic disease.

Methods

This was a cross-sectional study of 8- to 27-month-old children from the Isle of Wight, UK, including two groups: a group of children consuming a cows' milk exclusion (CME) diet and a control group of children consuming an unrestricted diet. Parents completed a validated food frequency questionnaire, from which dietary variety and consumption of food groups were calculated. Growth measurements were recorded.

Results

A total of 126 participants of mean age 13.0 months were recruited. In addition to the expected differences in dairy and soya consumption, the CME group consumed sweet foods 1.6 times less frequently, non-water drinks seven times less frequently (p < 0.05) and ready-made baby foods 15 times more frequently (p < 0.01) than the control group. Overall dietary variety was significantly lower in the CME group (p < 0.01) as was variety of meat and sweet foods consumed. There was a greater concern with healthy eating in the CME group (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Children consuming an exclusion diet for cows' milk allergy have an overall less varied diet, including a less varied consumption of meat and sweet foods. Efforts should be made to ensure exclusion diets are as varied as possible to optimize nutritional intake.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 May 2016
Published date: August 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399103
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399103
ISSN: 0905-6157
PURE UUID: b4023191-7a7f-40e4-8532-5b85de8e4458

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Aug 2016 09:20
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 06:36

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Contributors

Author: Kate Maslin
Author: Tara Dean
Author: Carina Venter

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