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Rising atmospheric CO2 explains 26–52% of the recent delay in autumnal senescence in important forest and crop species

Rising atmospheric CO2 explains 26–52% of the recent delay in autumnal senescence in important forest and crop species
Rising atmospheric CO2 explains 26–52% of the recent delay in autumnal senescence in important forest and crop species
There is strong evidence to suggest that global warming is leading to an extended
growing season by altering the timing of autumnal events such as bud set and leaf
abscission1,2,3, with important impacts on ecosystem productivity and global
carbon cycling. However, while temperature is an important driver of spring
phenological events, the relationship between temperature and autumn phenology
is weak4. Here, we present results from three open-air field experiments in which
elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] at the concentration likely to exist
in 2050, extended the growing season of: (1) three abundant North American forest
trees; (2) the world’s most extensively grown broad-leaved crop (soybean); and (3) two European poplars. Across experiments and over multiple years, elevated
[CO2] delayed autumnal declines in leaf area, chlorophyll concentration,
photosynthesis and normalized vegetation difference index (NVDI) by 2-7 days for
soybean and 5-15 days for trees. These findings indicate that [CO2] alters growing
season length and the rise in atmospheric [CO2] over the past 30 years could
explain 26-52% of the extended growing season now ascribed to warming3.
18pp
Karnosky, Davis F
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Taylor, Gail
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Giardina, Christian P
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Tallis, Matthew J
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Bernacchi, Carl J
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Percy, Kevin E
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DeLucia, Evan H
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Miglietta, Franco
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Gupta, Pooja S
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Leakey, Andrew DB
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Rogers, Alistair
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Dermody, Orla
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Gioili, Beniamino
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Nelson, Randall L
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Morgan, Patrick B
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Ort, Don R
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Calfapietra, Carlo
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Gielen, Birgit
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Sober, Jaak
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Mies, Tim
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McDonald, Evan
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Kubiske, Mark E
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Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe E
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Hendrey, George R
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Kets, Katre
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Long, Stephen P
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Karnosky, Davis F
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Taylor, Gail
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Giardina, Christian P
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Tallis, Matthew J
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Bernacchi, Carl J
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Percy, Kevin E
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DeLucia, Evan H
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Miglietta, Franco
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Gupta, Pooja S
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Leakey, Andrew DB
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Rogers, Alistair
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Dermody, Orla
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Gioili, Beniamino
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Nelson, Randall L
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Morgan, Patrick B
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Ort, Don R
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Calfapietra, Carlo
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Gielen, Birgit
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Sober, Jaak
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Mies, Tim
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McDonald, Evan
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Kubiske, Mark E
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Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe E
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Hendrey, George R
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Kets, Katre
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Long, Stephen P
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Karnosky, Davis F, Taylor, Gail, Giardina, Christian P, Tallis, Matthew J, Bernacchi, Carl J, Percy, Kevin E, DeLucia, Evan H, Miglietta, Franco, Gupta, Pooja S, Leakey, Andrew DB, Rogers, Alistair, Dermody, Orla, Gioili, Beniamino, Nelson, Randall L, Morgan, Patrick B, Ort, Don R, Calfapietra, Carlo, Gielen, Birgit, Sober, Jaak, Mies, Tim, McDonald, Evan, Kubiske, Mark E, Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe E, Hendrey, George R, Kets, Katre and Long, Stephen P (2006) Rising atmospheric CO2 explains 26–52% of the recent delay in autumnal senescence in important forest and crop species. Post-print, 18pp.

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is strong evidence to suggest that global warming is leading to an extended
growing season by altering the timing of autumnal events such as bud set and leaf
abscission1,2,3, with important impacts on ecosystem productivity and global
carbon cycling. However, while temperature is an important driver of spring
phenological events, the relationship between temperature and autumn phenology
is weak4. Here, we present results from three open-air field experiments in which
elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] at the concentration likely to exist
in 2050, extended the growing season of: (1) three abundant North American forest
trees; (2) the world’s most extensively grown broad-leaved crop (soybean); and (3) two European poplars. Across experiments and over multiple years, elevated
[CO2] delayed autumnal declines in leaf area, chlorophyll concentration,
photosynthesis and normalized vegetation difference index (NVDI) by 2-7 days for
soybean and 5-15 days for trees. These findings indicate that [CO2] alters growing
season length and the rise in atmospheric [CO2] over the past 30 years could
explain 26-52% of the extended growing season now ascribed to warming3.

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Published date: 2006

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 39925
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/39925
PURE UUID: 2f91f74c-a06c-4af6-936b-8a64ec7af0c5
ORCID for Gail Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8470-6390

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Date deposited: 09 May 2007
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:11

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Contributors

Author: Davis F Karnosky
Author: Gail Taylor ORCID iD
Author: Christian P Giardina
Author: Matthew J Tallis
Author: Carl J Bernacchi
Author: Kevin E Percy
Author: Evan H DeLucia
Author: Franco Miglietta
Author: Pooja S Gupta
Author: Andrew DB Leakey
Author: Alistair Rogers
Author: Orla Dermody
Author: Beniamino Gioili
Author: Randall L Nelson
Author: Patrick B Morgan
Author: Don R Ort
Author: Carlo Calfapietra
Author: Birgit Gielen
Author: Jaak Sober
Author: Tim Mies
Author: Evan McDonald
Author: Mark E Kubiske
Author: Giuseppe E Scarascia-Mugnozza
Author: George R Hendrey
Author: Katre Kets
Author: Stephen P Long

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