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The incidence of sexually acquired reactive arthritis: a systematic literature review

The incidence of sexually acquired reactive arthritis: a systematic literature review
The incidence of sexually acquired reactive arthritis: a systematic literature review
Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an inflammatory spondyloarthritis occurring after infection at a distant site. Chlamydia trachomatis is proposed to be the most common cause of ReA, yet the incidence of sexually acquired ReA (SARA) has not been well established. We therefore carried out a systematic literature review to collate and critically evaluate the published evidence regarding the incidence of SARA. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched using free-text and MeSH terms relating to infection and ReA. The title and abstract of articles returned were screened independently by two reviewers and potentially relevant articles assessed in full. Data was extracted from relevant articles and a risk of bias assessment carried out using a validated tool. Heterogeneity of study methodology and results precluded meta-analysis. The search yielded a total of 11,680 articles, and a further 17 were identified from review articles. After screening, 55 papers were assessed in full, from which 3 met the relevant inclusion criteria for the review. The studies reported an incidence of SARA of 3.0–8.1 % and were found to be of low to moderate quality. More studies are required to address the lack of data regarding the incidence of SARA. Specific and sensitive classification criteria must be developed in order for consistent classification and valid conclusions to be drawn. In clinical practice, it is recommended clinicians discuss the possibility of ReA developing at the time of STI diagnosis and to encourage patients to return if they experience any relevant symptoms.
incidence, reactive arthritis, rheumatic diseases, sexually transmitted infections, systematic review
0770-3198
1-10
Denison, Hayley
ef999cd1-4d3b-4e91-a301-0c2d4e5ba64d
Curtis, Elizabeth
12aba0c3-1e9e-49ef-a7e9-3247e649cdd6
Clynes, Michael A.
b860d3b7-12ee-42b8-8cd5-1e1abfccbee2
Bromhead, Collette
f72a8ee3-2d85-4308-a689-1bca8e5b5ed8
Dennison, Elaine M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Grainger, Rebecca
16826e50-56c6-4544-92d6-0fe47e878095
Denison, Hayley
ef999cd1-4d3b-4e91-a301-0c2d4e5ba64d
Curtis, Elizabeth
12aba0c3-1e9e-49ef-a7e9-3247e649cdd6
Clynes, Michael A.
b860d3b7-12ee-42b8-8cd5-1e1abfccbee2
Bromhead, Collette
f72a8ee3-2d85-4308-a689-1bca8e5b5ed8
Dennison, Elaine M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Grainger, Rebecca
16826e50-56c6-4544-92d6-0fe47e878095

Denison, Hayley, Curtis, Elizabeth, Clynes, Michael A., Bromhead, Collette, Dennison, Elaine M. and Grainger, Rebecca (2016) The incidence of sexually acquired reactive arthritis: a systematic literature review. Clinical Rheumatology, 1-10. (doi:10.1007/s10067-016-3364-0). (PMID:27480977)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an inflammatory spondyloarthritis occurring after infection at a distant site. Chlamydia trachomatis is proposed to be the most common cause of ReA, yet the incidence of sexually acquired ReA (SARA) has not been well established. We therefore carried out a systematic literature review to collate and critically evaluate the published evidence regarding the incidence of SARA. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched using free-text and MeSH terms relating to infection and ReA. The title and abstract of articles returned were screened independently by two reviewers and potentially relevant articles assessed in full. Data was extracted from relevant articles and a risk of bias assessment carried out using a validated tool. Heterogeneity of study methodology and results precluded meta-analysis. The search yielded a total of 11,680 articles, and a further 17 were identified from review articles. After screening, 55 papers were assessed in full, from which 3 met the relevant inclusion criteria for the review. The studies reported an incidence of SARA of 3.0–8.1 % and were found to be of low to moderate quality. More studies are required to address the lack of data regarding the incidence of SARA. Specific and sensitive classification criteria must be developed in order for consistent classification and valid conclusions to be drawn. In clinical practice, it is recommended clinicians discuss the possibility of ReA developing at the time of STI diagnosis and to encourage patients to return if they experience any relevant symptoms.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 August 2016
Keywords: incidence, reactive arthritis, rheumatic diseases, sexually transmitted infections, systematic review
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 399263
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399263
ISSN: 0770-3198
PURE UUID: ed9d5746-ab3d-4e56-9d7a-aea77ed7cc0f
ORCID for Elizabeth Curtis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5147-0550
ORCID for Michael A. Clynes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7597-7658
ORCID for Elaine M. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

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Date deposited: 10 Aug 2016 15:32
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:32

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Author: Hayley Denison
Author: Collette Bromhead
Author: Rebecca Grainger

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