The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Evaluation of rubber compounds for the development of wave energy converter

Evaluation of rubber compounds for the development of wave energy converter
Evaluation of rubber compounds for the development of wave energy converter
A wave energy converter (WEC) which is called Anaconda, is a cost effective wave energy device. The device seeks to exploit the concept of a distensible rubber tube. The concept of Anaconda has been proven at small laboratory scale and is seen as having low capital and operational costs. Different rubbers were quantified for building a good understanding of the range of stress-strain behavior and fatigue of rubber. The magnitude of the softening of several rubber formulations depends on the maximum strain applied. The larger the maximum strain applied, the greater the softening. A versatile tensile fatigue test machine was developed to enable a better understanding of fatigue, including non-relaxing fatigue to be developed for rubber or any other materials. For the fixed strain conditions used to screen candidate rubbers, a specific rubber compound performed the best compared both to the same unfilled rubber with antioxidant or no antioxidant in place, and a wide range of filled rubbers. The estimation on dynamic stress-strain loops and cyclic stress relaxation rates of each rubber has been made.
wave energy converter (WEC), rubber, softening, stress-strain, modulus, loss angle, fatigue
74-81
Kamaruddin, Shamsul
64966319-ae1e-4b33-a958-ed69bab137a8
Muhr, Alan E.
dcdb4ba0-f212-424e-aed3-e80f2f5b4afa
Hearn, Grant E.
c1b2912b-fe5c-432c-aaa4-39c5eff75178
Kamaruddin, Shamsul
64966319-ae1e-4b33-a958-ed69bab137a8
Muhr, Alan E.
dcdb4ba0-f212-424e-aed3-e80f2f5b4afa
Hearn, Grant E.
c1b2912b-fe5c-432c-aaa4-39c5eff75178

Kamaruddin, Shamsul, Muhr, Alan E. and Hearn, Grant E. (2015) Evaluation of rubber compounds for the development of wave energy converter. [in special issue: 28] International Journal of Technical Research and Applications, 74-81.

Record type: Article

Abstract

A wave energy converter (WEC) which is called Anaconda, is a cost effective wave energy device. The device seeks to exploit the concept of a distensible rubber tube. The concept of Anaconda has been proven at small laboratory scale and is seen as having low capital and operational costs. Different rubbers were quantified for building a good understanding of the range of stress-strain behavior and fatigue of rubber. The magnitude of the softening of several rubber formulations depends on the maximum strain applied. The larger the maximum strain applied, the greater the softening. A versatile tensile fatigue test machine was developed to enable a better understanding of fatigue, including non-relaxing fatigue to be developed for rubber or any other materials. For the fixed strain conditions used to screen candidate rubbers, a specific rubber compound performed the best compared both to the same unfilled rubber with antioxidant or no antioxidant in place, and a wide range of filled rubbers. The estimation on dynamic stress-strain loops and cyclic stress relaxation rates of each rubber has been made.

Text
Shamsul et al paper to IEEE_format SK2.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy
Text
evaluation-of-rubber-compounds-for-the-development-of-wave-energy-converter- Journal.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Published date: 1 August 2015
Keywords: wave energy converter (WEC), rubber, softening, stress-strain, modulus, loss angle, fatigue
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399288
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399288
PURE UUID: c4c491bd-c271-47ab-a12e-c023290fa6af

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Aug 2016 16:24
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 11:26

Export record

Contributors

Author: Shamsul Kamaruddin
Author: Alan E. Muhr
Author: Grant E. Hearn

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×