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Investigation of diesel hybrid systems for fuel oil reduction in slow speed ocean going ships

Investigation of diesel hybrid systems for fuel oil reduction in slow speed ocean going ships
Investigation of diesel hybrid systems for fuel oil reduction in slow speed ocean going ships
The volatile world economy and the adoption of stricter emission policies from the European Union and the International Maritime Organisation greatly affect the shipping industry. This paper is focused on the potential of Diesel Hybrid power systems to increase fuel efficiency for ocean going slow speed ships. Alternatives in on-board energy generation, management and storage strategies are investigated. The mathematical implementation and simulation of the power train components is demonstrated using a systematic approach. Vessel operational profiles were incorporated to the power train optimisation problem. The optimisation scenarios were run using a modified for marine power systems version of the Equivalent Cost Minimization Strategy. The results indicate fuel savings for auxiliary loads as a result of the absence of conversion losses. For the main Diesel hybrid propulsion, the system is deemed infeasible. Nevertheless, for the combined Hybrid power train, the savings are achieved by proper handling of the originated energy from the Main and Auxiliary engines.
0360-5442
444-456
Dedes, Eleftherios
1a9f67e5-3397-4999-ae23-c2f569d3c379
Hudson, Dominic
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Dedes, Eleftherios
1a9f67e5-3397-4999-ae23-c2f569d3c379
Hudson, Dominic
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce

Dedes, Eleftherios, Hudson, Dominic and Turnock, Stephen (2016) Investigation of diesel hybrid systems for fuel oil reduction in slow speed ocean going ships. Energy, 114, 444-456. (doi:10.1016/j.energy.2016.07.121).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The volatile world economy and the adoption of stricter emission policies from the European Union and the International Maritime Organisation greatly affect the shipping industry. This paper is focused on the potential of Diesel Hybrid power systems to increase fuel efficiency for ocean going slow speed ships. Alternatives in on-board energy generation, management and storage strategies are investigated. The mathematical implementation and simulation of the power train components is demonstrated using a systematic approach. Vessel operational profiles were incorporated to the power train optimisation problem. The optimisation scenarios were run using a modified for marine power systems version of the Equivalent Cost Minimization Strategy. The results indicate fuel savings for auxiliary loads as a result of the absence of conversion losses. For the main Diesel hybrid propulsion, the system is deemed infeasible. Nevertheless, for the combined Hybrid power train, the savings are achieved by proper handling of the originated energy from the Main and Auxiliary engines.

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Paper - Journal of Energy-REVISION-V4-FINAL.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 23 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 August 2016
Published date: 1 November 2016
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399359
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399359
ISSN: 0360-5442
PURE UUID: 3fbaaf54-13aa-4bc5-ad69-32e4b51927ee
ORCID for Dominic Hudson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2012-6255
ORCID for Stephen Turnock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6288-0400

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Date deposited: 12 Aug 2016 13:57
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 04:55

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Contributors

Author: Eleftherios Dedes
Author: Dominic Hudson ORCID iD
Author: Stephen Turnock ORCID iD

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