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Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation influences the whole blood transcriptome in women with obesity, associated with pro-resolving lipid mediator production

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation influences the whole blood transcriptome in women with obesity, associated with pro-resolving lipid mediator production
Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation influences the whole blood transcriptome in women with obesity, associated with pro-resolving lipid mediator production
The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may reduce low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. The relationship between therapeutic response to n-3 PUFAs and modification of the transcriptome in obesity or metabolic syndrome remains to be explored.

Blood samples were obtained from women with obesity before and after three-months supplementation with a moderate dose of n-3 PUFAs (1.8 g EPA + DHA per day) or from controls. n-3 PUFAs (GC) and plasma concentrations of lipoxins, resolvins, protectin X (GC-MS/MS) and inflammatory markers (ELISA) were measured. Whole blood transcriptome was assayed using microarray.

Women supplemented with n-3 PUFAs for 3 months had significantly higher levels of EPA and DHA in plasma phosphatidylcholine. n-3 PUFA supplementation, in contrast to placebo, significantly decreased the concentrations of several inflammatory markers (SELE, MCP-1, sVCAM-1, sPECAM-1, and hsCRP), fasting triglycerides and insulin and increased the concentrations of pro-resolving DHA derivatives in plasma. The microarray data demonstrated effects of n-3 PUFAs on PPAR-?, NRF2 and NF-?B target genes.

N-3 PUFAs increased DHA-derived pro-resolving mediators in women with obesity. Elevated resolvins and up-regulation of the resolvin receptor occurred in parallel with activation of PPAR-? target genes related to lipid metabolism and of NRF2 up-regulated antioxidant enzymes.
1388-1981
1746-1755
Polus, A.
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Zapala, B.
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Razny, U.
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Gielicz, A.
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Kiec-Wilk, B.
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Malczewska-Malec, M.
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Sanak, M.
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Childs, C.E.
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Calder, P.C.
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Dembinska-Kiec, A.
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Polus, A.
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Zapala, B.
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Razny, U.
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Gielicz, A.
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Kiec-Wilk, B.
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Malczewska-Malec, M.
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Sanak, M.
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Childs, C.E.
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Calder, P.C.
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Dembinska-Kiec, A.
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Polus, A., Zapala, B., Razny, U., Gielicz, A., Kiec-Wilk, B., Malczewska-Malec, M., Sanak, M., Childs, C.E., Calder, P.C. and Dembinska-Kiec, A. (2016) Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation influences the whole blood transcriptome in women with obesity, associated with pro-resolving lipid mediator production. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 1861 (11), 1746-1755. (doi:10.1016/j.bbalip.2016.08.005). (PMID:27531277)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may reduce low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. The relationship between therapeutic response to n-3 PUFAs and modification of the transcriptome in obesity or metabolic syndrome remains to be explored.

Blood samples were obtained from women with obesity before and after three-months supplementation with a moderate dose of n-3 PUFAs (1.8 g EPA + DHA per day) or from controls. n-3 PUFAs (GC) and plasma concentrations of lipoxins, resolvins, protectin X (GC-MS/MS) and inflammatory markers (ELISA) were measured. Whole blood transcriptome was assayed using microarray.

Women supplemented with n-3 PUFAs for 3 months had significantly higher levels of EPA and DHA in plasma phosphatidylcholine. n-3 PUFA supplementation, in contrast to placebo, significantly decreased the concentrations of several inflammatory markers (SELE, MCP-1, sVCAM-1, sPECAM-1, and hsCRP), fasting triglycerides and insulin and increased the concentrations of pro-resolving DHA derivatives in plasma. The microarray data demonstrated effects of n-3 PUFAs on PPAR-?, NRF2 and NF-?B target genes.

N-3 PUFAs increased DHA-derived pro-resolving mediators in women with obesity. Elevated resolvins and up-regulation of the resolvin receptor occurred in parallel with activation of PPAR-? target genes related to lipid metabolism and of NRF2 up-regulated antioxidant enzymes.

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Accepted/In Press date: 10 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 August 2016
Published date: 12 August 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399416
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399416
ISSN: 1388-1981
PURE UUID: 128a1193-9292-4a84-8ca7-4a42cf678126
ORCID for C.E. Childs: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6832-224X
ORCID for P.C. Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Aug 2016 12:57
Last modified: 11 Mar 2021 02:35

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