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Maternal serum retinol and B-carotene concentrations and neonatal bone mineralisation: Results from the Southampton Women's Survey cohort

Maternal serum retinol and B-carotene concentrations and neonatal bone mineralisation: Results from the Southampton Women's Survey cohort
Maternal serum retinol and B-carotene concentrations and neonatal bone mineralisation: Results from the Southampton Women's Survey cohort
Background: studies in older adults and animals have suggested contrasting relations between bone health and different vitamin A compounds. To our knowledge, the associations between maternal vitamin A status and offspring bone development have not previously been elucidated.

Objective: we examined the associations between maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene concentrations during late pregnancy and offspring bone mineralization assessed at birth with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Design: in the Southampton Women’s Survey mother-offspring birth cohort, maternal health, lifestyle, and diet were assessed prepregnancy and at 11 and 34 wk of gestation. In late pregnancy, maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene concentrations were measured. Offspring total body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and bone area (BA) were measured within 2 wk after birth.

Results: in total, 520 and 446 mother-offspring pairs had measurements of maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene, respectively. Higher maternal serum retinol in late pregnancy was associated with lower offspring total body BMC (? = ?0.10 SD/SD; 95% CI: ?0.19, ?0.02; P = 0.020) and BA (? = ?0.12 SD/SD; 95% CI: ?0.20, ?0.03; P = 0.009) but not BMD. Conversely, higher maternal serum ?-carotene concentrations in late pregnancy were associated with greater total body BMC (? = 0.12 SD/SD; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.21; P = 0.016) and BA (? = 0.12 SD/SD; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.22; P = 0.010) but not BMD.

Conclusions: maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene concentrations had differing associations with offspring bone size and growth at birth: retinol was negatively associated with these measurements, whereas ?-carotene was positively associated. These findings highlight the need for further investigation of the effects of maternal retinol and carotenoid status on offspring bone development
0002-9165
1-24
Handel, Mina N.
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Moon, Rebecca J.
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Titcombe, Philip
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Abrahamsen, Bo
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Heitmann, Berit L.
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Calder, Philip C.
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Dennison, Elaine M.
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Robinson, Sian M.
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Godfrey, Keith M.
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Inskip, Hazel M.
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Cooper, Cyrus
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Harvey, Nicholas C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Handel, Mina N.
05aabe31-af7b-4b60-af15-c063d6d14201
Moon, Rebecca J.
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Titcombe, Philip
a84c9fad-0580-42f9-8bb6-db0fe20435aa
Abrahamsen, Bo
ea627e06-482e-479f-8631-5b0f3aec5d13
Heitmann, Berit L.
85d9c09f-5418-4e50-8dcb-7948dcb22c0f
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Dennison, Elaine M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Robinson, Sian M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Godfrey, Keith M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Inskip, Hazel M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145

Handel, Mina N., Moon, Rebecca J., Titcombe, Philip, Abrahamsen, Bo, Heitmann, Berit L., Calder, Philip C., Dennison, Elaine M., Robinson, Sian M., Godfrey, Keith M., Inskip, Hazel M., Cooper, Cyrus and Harvey, Nicholas C. (2016) Maternal serum retinol and B-carotene concentrations and neonatal bone mineralisation: Results from the Southampton Women's Survey cohort. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1-24. (doi:10.3945/?ajcn.116.130146).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: studies in older adults and animals have suggested contrasting relations between bone health and different vitamin A compounds. To our knowledge, the associations between maternal vitamin A status and offspring bone development have not previously been elucidated.

Objective: we examined the associations between maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene concentrations during late pregnancy and offspring bone mineralization assessed at birth with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Design: in the Southampton Women’s Survey mother-offspring birth cohort, maternal health, lifestyle, and diet were assessed prepregnancy and at 11 and 34 wk of gestation. In late pregnancy, maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene concentrations were measured. Offspring total body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and bone area (BA) were measured within 2 wk after birth.

Results: in total, 520 and 446 mother-offspring pairs had measurements of maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene, respectively. Higher maternal serum retinol in late pregnancy was associated with lower offspring total body BMC (? = ?0.10 SD/SD; 95% CI: ?0.19, ?0.02; P = 0.020) and BA (? = ?0.12 SD/SD; 95% CI: ?0.20, ?0.03; P = 0.009) but not BMD. Conversely, higher maternal serum ?-carotene concentrations in late pregnancy were associated with greater total body BMC (? = 0.12 SD/SD; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.21; P = 0.016) and BA (? = 0.12 SD/SD; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.22; P = 0.010) but not BMD.

Conclusions: maternal serum retinol and ?-carotene concentrations had differing associations with offspring bone size and growth at birth: retinol was negatively associated with these measurements, whereas ?-carotene was positively associated. These findings highlight the need for further investigation of the effects of maternal retinol and carotenoid status on offspring bone development

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Accepted/In Press date: 1 August 2016
Published date: 14 September 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399707
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399707
ISSN: 0002-9165
PURE UUID: ae78d7f7-868f-4e88-9bd7-df6d224620db
ORCID for Philip Titcombe: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7797-8571
ORCID for Philip C. Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X
ORCID for Elaine M. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for Sian M. Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269
ORCID for Keith M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Hazel M. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Nicholas C. Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512

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Date deposited: 25 Aug 2016 08:27
Last modified: 11 Mar 2021 02:35

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Contributors

Author: Mina N. Handel
Author: Rebecca J. Moon
Author: Philip Titcombe ORCID iD
Author: Bo Abrahamsen
Author: Berit L. Heitmann
Author: Sian M. Robinson ORCID iD
Author: Hazel M. Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD

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