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Longitudinal methods for life course research: a comparison of sequence analysis, latent class growth models, and multistate event history models for studying partnership transitions

Longitudinal methods for life course research: a comparison of sequence analysis, latent class growth models, and multistate event history models for studying partnership transitions
Longitudinal methods for life course research: a comparison of sequence analysis, latent class growth models, and multistate event history models for studying partnership transitions
This paper compares and contrasts three methods that are useful for life course researchers; the more widely used sequence analysis, the promising but less often applied latent class growth models, and multistate event history models. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are highlighted by applying them to the same empirical problem. Using data from the Norwegian Generations and Gender Survey, changes in the partnership status of women born between 1955 and 1964 are modelled, with education as the primary covariate of interest. We show that latent class growth models and multistate event history models are a useful addition to life course researchers’ methodological toolkit and that these methods can address certain research questions better than the more commonly applied sequence analysis or simple event history analysis.
78
ESRC Centre for Population Change
Mikolai, Julia
68b2a009-add5-4e59-add3-d6530c34e21e
Lyons-Amos, Mark
ceedb006-c671-4e2d-8fed-bef1cf40603d
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Mikolai, Julia
68b2a009-add5-4e59-add3-d6530c34e21e
Lyons-Amos, Mark
ceedb006-c671-4e2d-8fed-bef1cf40603d
Mcgowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2

Mikolai, Julia and Lyons-Amos, Mark , Mcgowan, Teresa (ed.) (2016) Longitudinal methods for life course research: a comparison of sequence analysis, latent class growth models, and multistate event history models for studying partnership transitions (ESRC Centre for Population Change Working Papers, 78) Southampton, GB. ESRC Centre for Population Change 34pp.

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

This paper compares and contrasts three methods that are useful for life course researchers; the more widely used sequence analysis, the promising but less often applied latent class growth models, and multistate event history models. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are highlighted by applying them to the same empirical problem. Using data from the Norwegian Generations and Gender Survey, changes in the partnership status of women born between 1955 and 1964 are modelled, with education as the primary covariate of interest. We show that latent class growth models and multistate event history models are a useful addition to life course researchers’ methodological toolkit and that these methods can address certain research questions better than the more commonly applied sequence analysis or simple event history analysis.

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More information

Published date: 25 August 2016
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography, Centre for Population Change

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399746
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399746
PURE UUID: 854858b7-60d9-4d6d-a5ea-ed4fb2e301fe

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Date deposited: 26 Aug 2016 11:09
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 11:34

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Contributors

Author: Julia Mikolai
Author: Mark Lyons-Amos
Editor: Teresa Mcgowan

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