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Parents’ and carers’ views about emollients for childhood eczema: qualitative interview study

Parents’ and carers’ views about emollients for childhood eczema: qualitative interview study
Parents’ and carers’ views about emollients for childhood eczema: qualitative interview study
Objective: Leave-on emollients form the mainstay of eczema treatment, but adherence is poor. We aimed to explore parents’/carers' views on effectiveness and acceptability of leave-on emollients for childhood eczema through secondary analysis of data from 2 qualitative data sets.

Setting: Study 1 recruited through mail-out from 6 general practices in southern England. Study 2 recruited from a feasibility trial of an intervention to support eczema self-care in 31 practices in the same area.

Participants: Study 1 included 28 interviews with carers of children aged ?5?years with eczema. Study 2 included 26 interviews with carers of children aged ?5?years with eczema.

Methods: Interviews followed semistructured guides: study 1 explored carers' understandings around eczema treatments in order to develop a web-based self-care support intervention; study 2 explored carers' understandings of eczema and eczema treatments after using the intervention. Interviews were carried out face to face or by telephone, audio-recorded and transcribed. Secondary analysis of data from both studies focused on views and experiences of emollient use. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach facilitated by NVivo V.10 software.

Results: In study 1, most participants felt emollients improved eczema but held mixed views about long-term use to prevent flare-ups. In study 2, where carers had used the web-based intervention, all participants held positive views about long-term emollient use. In both studies, participants expressed a range of preferences about emollient ‘thickness’; some felt that ‘thick’ emollients (ointments) were most effective, while others found these difficult to use. Carers described a process of ‘trial and error’, trying emollients suggested by professionals, friends and family, or bought over-the-counter. Carers expressed a need for understanding differences between products and their effective use.

Conclusions: Providing a rationale for long-term emollient use and choice of emollients could help improve adherence and help families gain more rapid control of eczema.
1-9
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Lewis-Jones, Sue
8427ec8f-c5de-4c15-8cd0-3dd0e1e4e03a
Ersser, Steven
09c17777-b01e-495e-b3ad-d7e4035b88e2
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Santer, Miriam
3ce7e832-31eb-4d27-9876-3a1cd7f381dc
Muller, Ingrid
2569bf42-51bd-40da-bbfd-dd4dbbd62cad
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Lewis-Jones, Sue
8427ec8f-c5de-4c15-8cd0-3dd0e1e4e03a
Ersser, Steven
09c17777-b01e-495e-b3ad-d7e4035b88e2
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777

Santer, Miriam, Muller, Ingrid, Yardley, Lucy, Lewis-Jones, Sue, Ersser, Steven and Little, Paul (2016) Parents’ and carers’ views about emollients for childhood eczema: qualitative interview study. BMJ Open, 6 (e011887), 1-9. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011887).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Leave-on emollients form the mainstay of eczema treatment, but adherence is poor. We aimed to explore parents’/carers' views on effectiveness and acceptability of leave-on emollients for childhood eczema through secondary analysis of data from 2 qualitative data sets.

Setting: Study 1 recruited through mail-out from 6 general practices in southern England. Study 2 recruited from a feasibility trial of an intervention to support eczema self-care in 31 practices in the same area.

Participants: Study 1 included 28 interviews with carers of children aged ?5?years with eczema. Study 2 included 26 interviews with carers of children aged ?5?years with eczema.

Methods: Interviews followed semistructured guides: study 1 explored carers' understandings around eczema treatments in order to develop a web-based self-care support intervention; study 2 explored carers' understandings of eczema and eczema treatments after using the intervention. Interviews were carried out face to face or by telephone, audio-recorded and transcribed. Secondary analysis of data from both studies focused on views and experiences of emollient use. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach facilitated by NVivo V.10 software.

Results: In study 1, most participants felt emollients improved eczema but held mixed views about long-term use to prevent flare-ups. In study 2, where carers had used the web-based intervention, all participants held positive views about long-term emollient use. In both studies, participants expressed a range of preferences about emollient ‘thickness’; some felt that ‘thick’ emollients (ointments) were most effective, while others found these difficult to use. Carers described a process of ‘trial and error’, trying emollients suggested by professionals, friends and family, or bought over-the-counter. Carers expressed a need for understanding differences between products and their effective use.

Conclusions: Providing a rationale for long-term emollient use and choice of emollients could help improve adherence and help families gain more rapid control of eczema.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 August 2016
Published date: August 2016
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399828
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399828
PURE UUID: 33046cf2-7cbc-4505-b5cd-ebf68188b060
ORCID for Miriam Santer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7264-5260
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Aug 2016 09:07
Last modified: 15 Oct 2019 00:49

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