The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.

The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.
The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.
Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (?CT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by ?CT analysis (p?<?0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.
1-12
Moreno-Jiménez, Ines
4dbe5fd4-8b2b-48c6-8c48-4833fd7d7d50
Hulsart Billstrom, Gry
41799212-48c4-4791-9a24-9090a77ba6cc
Lanham, Stuart A.
28fdbbef-e3b6-4fdf-bd0f-4968eeb614d6
Janeczek, Agnieszka A.
81b58bec-079a-4484-b855-ec01ca49ec60
Kontouli, Nasia
63602628-7753-421d-817e-071cd752b848
Kanczler, Janos M.
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Evans, Nicholas D.
0982bf3e-b3f5-4682-9238-f362d6471992
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Moreno-Jiménez, Ines
4dbe5fd4-8b2b-48c6-8c48-4833fd7d7d50
Hulsart Billstrom, Gry
41799212-48c4-4791-9a24-9090a77ba6cc
Lanham, Stuart A.
28fdbbef-e3b6-4fdf-bd0f-4968eeb614d6
Janeczek, Agnieszka A.
81b58bec-079a-4484-b855-ec01ca49ec60
Kontouli, Nasia
63602628-7753-421d-817e-071cd752b848
Kanczler, Janos M.
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Evans, Nicholas D.
0982bf3e-b3f5-4682-9238-f362d6471992
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778

Moreno-Jiménez, Ines, Hulsart Billstrom, Gry, Lanham, Stuart A., Janeczek, Agnieszka A., Kontouli, Nasia, Kanczler, Janos M., Evans, Nicholas D. and Oreffo, Richard O.C. (2016) The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering. Scientific Reports, 6 (32168), 1-12. (doi:10.1038/srep32168). (PMID:27577960)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (?CT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by ?CT analysis (p?<?0.01). This human-avian system offers a simple refinement model for animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

Text
The chorioallantoic membrane CAM assay for the study of human bone regeneration a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 August 2016
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399874
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399874
PURE UUID: 59446fb8-18d4-4ccd-92c2-81340fcfc7fe
ORCID for Stuart A. Lanham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4516-264X
ORCID for Janos M. Kanczler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7249-0414
ORCID for Richard O.C. Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Sep 2016 09:54
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:51

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Ines Moreno-Jiménez
Author: Gry Hulsart Billstrom
Author: Stuart A. Lanham ORCID iD
Author: Agnieszka A. Janeczek
Author: Nasia Kontouli
Author: Janos M. Kanczler ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas D. Evans

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×