The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Political representation and popular culture: when Big Brother met George Galloway, MP

Political representation and popular culture: when Big Brother met George Galloway, MP
Political representation and popular culture: when Big Brother met George Galloway, MP
In 2006, George Galloway MP appeared in Celebrity Big Brother. His participation produced a public outcry from people concerned that a politician should take part in a reality TV show instead of looking after their constituency. Even when the MP justified his action as an attempt to raise awareness about politics among young people, critics maintained their scepticism. This article suggests that the rhetoric of ‘ordinariness’, ‘authenticity’ and ‘trust’ exploited in Celebrity Big Brother 2006 (CBB06) frame an understanding of representation that is rooted in the UK’s model of Public Service Broadcasting, and that this should be seen as political. Drawing upon democratic theory and using the case of CBB06, this article evaluates how popular television programmes like Big Brother articulate political ideas and values that should be taken seriously by political scientists.
1746-918X
146-160
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e

Cardo, Valentina (2014) Political representation and popular culture: when Big Brother met George Galloway, MP. British Politics, 9 (2), 146-160. (doi:10.1057/bp.2013.22).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In 2006, George Galloway MP appeared in Celebrity Big Brother. His participation produced a public outcry from people concerned that a politician should take part in a reality TV show instead of looking after their constituency. Even when the MP justified his action as an attempt to raise awareness about politics among young people, critics maintained their scepticism. This article suggests that the rhetoric of ‘ordinariness’, ‘authenticity’ and ‘trust’ exploited in Celebrity Big Brother 2006 (CBB06) frame an understanding of representation that is rooted in the UK’s model of Public Service Broadcasting, and that this should be seen as political. Drawing upon democratic theory and using the case of CBB06, this article evaluates how popular television programmes like Big Brother articulate political ideas and values that should be taken seriously by political scientists.

Other
bp.2013.22 - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 16 September 2013
Published date: June 2014
Organisations: Winchester School of Art

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400391
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400391
ISSN: 1746-918X
PURE UUID: 03a69de6-9037-409e-833a-9c73831b1bd6

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Sep 2016 14:37
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 18:14

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Valentina Cardo

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×