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Are mesenchymal stem cells so bloody great after all?

Are mesenchymal stem cells so bloody great after all?
Are mesenchymal stem cells so bloody great after all?
This perspective discusses some activities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the context of angiogenesis, focusing on contrasting effects that could call into question the extent to which MSCs can be used clinically in the future. We report on the antiangiogenic/antiproliferative effects of specific MSC populations (including bone marrow MSCs), their paracrine activity, tissue heterogeneity, and endothelial cell interactions. Also discussed are what could lead to contrasting effects of the influence of MSCs in regulating angiogenesis, pointing to some negative effects of these cells. In conclusion, this article highlights important aspects of MSC behavior within the perspective of translational medicine applications.

Significance

Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be extracted from virtually every organ and tissue in the body. Although they have previously been shown to be an important source of blood vessel-attracting factors, useful for tissue repair and regenerative medicine, recent studies have found that specific MSC populations can also produce factors that inhibit blood vessel growth. Abnormal vascularization is associated with the progression of many diseases, and identification of these unique blood vessel-inhibiting MSCs has highlighted a potential source of cytotoxic factors that could be used to control pathological angiogenesis, for example, tumors
2157-6580
Marfy-Smith, S.J.
2020fb0a-d6eb-4516-b390-308bba053de9
Clarkin, Claire
05cd2a88-1127-41aa-a29b-7ac323b4f3c9
Marfy-Smith, S.J.
2020fb0a-d6eb-4516-b390-308bba053de9
Clarkin, Claire
05cd2a88-1127-41aa-a29b-7ac323b4f3c9

Marfy-Smith, S.J. and Clarkin, Claire (2016) Are mesenchymal stem cells so bloody great after all? Stem Cells Translational Medicine. (doi:10.5966/sctm.2016-0026).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This perspective discusses some activities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the context of angiogenesis, focusing on contrasting effects that could call into question the extent to which MSCs can be used clinically in the future. We report on the antiangiogenic/antiproliferative effects of specific MSC populations (including bone marrow MSCs), their paracrine activity, tissue heterogeneity, and endothelial cell interactions. Also discussed are what could lead to contrasting effects of the influence of MSCs in regulating angiogenesis, pointing to some negative effects of these cells. In conclusion, this article highlights important aspects of MSC behavior within the perspective of translational medicine applications.

Significance

Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be extracted from virtually every organ and tissue in the body. Although they have previously been shown to be an important source of blood vessel-attracting factors, useful for tissue repair and regenerative medicine, recent studies have found that specific MSC populations can also produce factors that inhibit blood vessel growth. Abnormal vascularization is associated with the progression of many diseases, and identification of these unique blood vessel-inhibiting MSCs has highlighted a potential source of cytotoxic factors that could be used to control pathological angiogenesis, for example, tumors

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 September 2016
Published date: 9 September 2016
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400399
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400399
ISSN: 2157-6580
PURE UUID: 395d7e49-e453-4837-b243-100f64cf2b64

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Sep 2016 08:07
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 19:43

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