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Government as a social machine: the implications of government as a “social machine” for making and implementing market-based policy - Report 2: the Machines

Government as a social machine: the implications of government as a “social machine” for making and implementing market-based policy - Report 2: the Machines
Government as a social machine: the implications of government as a “social machine” for making and implementing market-based policy - Report 2: the Machines
This is the second of two reports from the Government as a Social Machine project. The first report gave an overview of the evolution of electronic/digital government, and explored the concept of 21st century government as a 'social machine'.

This report identifies seven social machines developed by governments in Australia and New Zealand. These social machines harness digital technologies in order to deliver more effective and efficient services, develop better business practices, and enable better accountability and transparency. The report gives an overview of each social machine in context, describing the social need that is being met and the community that has developed it, and begins to unravel some of the socio-political consequences that might arise from the use of these social machines within the public policy context.

These reports are not intended to be comprehensive (further educational materials are being developed as part of the ANZSOG Case Library), but they are intended to begin a conversation amongst those studying or practicing in public policy as to how governments can better understand, manage and employ these evolving social machines for better governance and social benefit
Australian Policy Online
Rowland-Campbell, Anni
f38582ef-88fc-44a2-9d4c-dc4fca085897
Vitale, Michael
4745ee2e-107f-45be-8ec6-5d41ac215584
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e
Thompson, Peter
c12103d9-d46c-464c-8904-5fbaaa499520
Rowland-Campbell, Anni
f38582ef-88fc-44a2-9d4c-dc4fca085897
Vitale, Michael
4745ee2e-107f-45be-8ec6-5d41ac215584
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e
Thompson, Peter
c12103d9-d46c-464c-8904-5fbaaa499520

Rowland-Campbell, Anni, Vitale, Michael, Cardo, Valentina and Thompson, Peter (2014) Government as a social machine: the implications of government as a “social machine” for making and implementing market-based policy - Report 2: the Machines Australian Policy Online (doi:10.4225/50/558216E570B17).

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

This is the second of two reports from the Government as a Social Machine project. The first report gave an overview of the evolution of electronic/digital government, and explored the concept of 21st century government as a 'social machine'.

This report identifies seven social machines developed by governments in Australia and New Zealand. These social machines harness digital technologies in order to deliver more effective and efficient services, develop better business practices, and enable better accountability and transparency. The report gives an overview of each social machine in context, describing the social need that is being met and the community that has developed it, and begins to unravel some of the socio-political consequences that might arise from the use of these social machines within the public policy context.

These reports are not intended to be comprehensive (further educational materials are being developed as part of the ANZSOG Case Library), but they are intended to begin a conversation amongst those studying or practicing in public policy as to how governments can better understand, manage and employ these evolving social machines for better governance and social benefit

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2014
Organisations: Winchester School of Art

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400402
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400402
PURE UUID: 003bd0c2-8bc8-4a7a-b511-c1efb8a0fe4c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Sep 2016 08:37
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 18:14

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