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An experimental investigation into whole body vibration generated during the hydroelastic slamming of a high speed craft

An experimental investigation into whole body vibration generated during the hydroelastic slamming of a high speed craft
An experimental investigation into whole body vibration generated during the hydroelastic slamming of a high speed craft
High-Speed planing Craft (HSC) expose their crew to levels of vibration that regularly exceed the daily exposure limit set out by European directive 2002/44/EU. The human exposure to vibration can cause many effects, from chronic and acute, to physiological and psychological. Many reduction methods are currently being researched, such as suspension seats, but Coats et al. (2003) and Coe et al. (2013) concluded that a combination of methods will be required to reduce the level sufficiently to meet the legislation. The highest levels of acceleration occur during the slamming of HSC.

This paper describes an experimental investigation to determine whether hydroelasticity can affect the slamming characteristics and Whole Body Vibration (WBV) of a HSC using quasi-2D and full-scale drop tests. The quasi-2D drop tests revealed that hydroelasticity can affect the peak acceleration and Vibration Dosage Value (VDV), and that a wooden hull generated higher magnitude WBV than fabric hulls. The full-scale drop tests were performed on a RNLI D-class inflatable lifeboat. Hydroelasticity was controlled using the internal pressures of the sponson and keel. The full-scale results show that the peak acceleration and VDV can be reduced by decreasing the internal pressures and structural stiffness at the transom and crew locations; however, this lead to an increase at the bow. This indicates that the WBV experienced by the crew can be reduced by considering hydroelasticity. Incorporating an element of hydroelasticity shows great potential, alongside other reduction strategies, to alleviate the human exposure to vibration on board HSC.
0029-8018
115-128
Halswell, Peter
4dcf5dcc-9cbb-4ca0-984b-09eba5fbb83e
Wilson, Philip A.
8307fa11-5d5e-47f6-9961-9d43767afa00
Taunton, Dominic
10bfbe83-c4c2-49c6-94c0-2de8098c648c
Austen, Steve
8c1d8821-a6e1-49b9-87d1-0d277280a6fd
Halswell, Peter
4dcf5dcc-9cbb-4ca0-984b-09eba5fbb83e
Wilson, Philip A.
8307fa11-5d5e-47f6-9961-9d43767afa00
Taunton, Dominic
10bfbe83-c4c2-49c6-94c0-2de8098c648c
Austen, Steve
8c1d8821-a6e1-49b9-87d1-0d277280a6fd

Halswell, Peter, Wilson, Philip A., Taunton, Dominic and Austen, Steve (2016) An experimental investigation into whole body vibration generated during the hydroelastic slamming of a high speed craft. Ocean Engineering, 126, 115-128. (doi:10.1016/j.oceaneng.2016.09.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

High-Speed planing Craft (HSC) expose their crew to levels of vibration that regularly exceed the daily exposure limit set out by European directive 2002/44/EU. The human exposure to vibration can cause many effects, from chronic and acute, to physiological and psychological. Many reduction methods are currently being researched, such as suspension seats, but Coats et al. (2003) and Coe et al. (2013) concluded that a combination of methods will be required to reduce the level sufficiently to meet the legislation. The highest levels of acceleration occur during the slamming of HSC.

This paper describes an experimental investigation to determine whether hydroelasticity can affect the slamming characteristics and Whole Body Vibration (WBV) of a HSC using quasi-2D and full-scale drop tests. The quasi-2D drop tests revealed that hydroelasticity can affect the peak acceleration and Vibration Dosage Value (VDV), and that a wooden hull generated higher magnitude WBV than fabric hulls. The full-scale drop tests were performed on a RNLI D-class inflatable lifeboat. Hydroelasticity was controlled using the internal pressures of the sponson and keel. The full-scale results show that the peak acceleration and VDV can be reduced by decreasing the internal pressures and structural stiffness at the transom and crew locations; however, this lead to an increase at the bow. This indicates that the WBV experienced by the crew can be reduced by considering hydroelasticity. Incorporating an element of hydroelasticity shows great potential, alongside other reduction strategies, to alleviate the human exposure to vibration on board HSC.

Text
Slamming Journal V2 3.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 September 2016
Published date: 1 November 2016
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400461
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400461
ISSN: 0029-8018
PURE UUID: efdd7fd2-5f77-41db-a8e7-c0e72295e7c6
ORCID for Philip A. Wilson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6939-682X
ORCID for Dominic Taunton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6865-089X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Sep 2016 13:40
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:51

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Contributors

Author: Peter Halswell
Author: Dominic Taunton ORCID iD
Author: Steve Austen

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